Hales


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Related to Hales: Thales, Stephen Hales

Hales

(hālz),
Stephen, English physiologist, 1677-1761. See: Hales piesimeter.
References in classic literature ?
When Eben Hale died, whose confidential secretary he was--nay, well-nigh adopted son and full business partner--he no longer came among us.
It was only the other day that Eben Hale was laid away in his stately marble mausoleum.
Hale opened the letter, read it, and tossed it upon my desk with a laugh.
Hale, when we say that we embark upon this course of action utterly devoid of animus.
Hale, attracted by the wall beyond, which was done in a bewitching honeycomb pattern dotted with golden bees.
Hale was Clara's aunt--old stock that had crossed the Plains.
Hale knew Saxon's mother or, rather, her poems; and produced, not only "The Story of the Files," but a ponderous scrapbook which contained many of her mother's poems which Saxon had never seen.
Hale talked of her own Journey across the Plains, a little girl, in the late Fifties, and, like Mrs.
It happened right below lawyer Varnum's, down at the bend of the Corbury road, just round about the time that Ruth got engaged to Ned Hale. The young folks was all friends, and I guess she just can't bear to talk about it.
Hale's silence, and-a little later-for the accident of personal contact with the man.
It seemed a prompt good way of weeding out people that had got stalled, and a plenty good enough way for those others; so I hunted up the two boys and said, "They went out back one night to stone the cat and fell down the well and got drowned." Next I searched around and found old Aunt Patsy and Aunt Betsy Hale where they were around, and said, "They went out back one night to visit the sick and fell down the well and got drowned." I was going to drown some others, but I gave up the idea, partly because I believed that if I kept that up it would arose attention, and perhaps sympathy with those people, and partly because it was not a large well and would not hold any more anyway.
There were strange faces in almost every house; in some he recognised the burly form of some old schoolfellow--a boy when he last saw him--surrounded by a troop of merry children; in others he saw, seated in an easy-chair at a cottage door, a feeble and infirm old man, whom he only remembered as a hale and hearty labourer; but they had all forgotten him, and he passed on unknown.