Haldane transformation

Hal·dane trans·for·ma·tion

(hawl'dān),
the multiplication of inspired oxygen concentration by the ratio of expired to inspired nitrogen concentrations in the calculation of oxygen consumption or respiratory quotient by the open circuit method.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

Haldane,

John S., Scottish physiologist at Oxford, 1860-1936.
Haldane apparatus - a device used for analyzing respiratory gases.
Haldane chamber - an obsolete chamber for metabolic studies on animals.
Haldane effect - the promotion of carbon dioxide dissociation by oxygenation of hemoglobin.
Haldane relationship - a mathematical relationship between the equilibrium constant of an enzyme-catalyzed reaction and all of that enzyme's kinetic parameters.
Haldane transformation - multiplication of inspired oxygen concentration by the ratio of expired to inspired nitrogen concentration in the calculation of oxygen consumption or respiratory quotient by the open circuit method.
Haldane tube - a tube for securing human alveolar air samples.
Haldane-Priestley sample - an approximation of alveolar gas obtained from the end of a sudden maximal expiration into a Haldane tube.
Medical Eponyms © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Previous devices for measurement of oxygen consumption ([Vo.sub.2]) in the clinical setting, such as the Datex-Ohmeda Deltatrac (Datex-Ohmeda, Helsinki, Finland) relate total flow rate out of the system to measured flow into the system by using the difference in measured nitrogen ([N.sub.2]) concentration in each (the Haldane transformation).
As outlined previously, the Haldane transformation is routinely used in indirect calorimetry techniques, utilising the inert nature of nitrogen in lung gas exchange.
The data were compared against the reverse Fick method and against standard indirect calorimetry using the Haldane transformation. When compared to the calculated reverse Fick oxygen uptake, a mean difference of +16.5% was found pre-bypass and +9.9% post-bypass, consistent with uptake of oxygen by lung tissue, which is not taken into account by the reverse Fick method.
Rates of [N.sub.2] elimination similar to those described by Beatty et al (28) can be calculated to produce an overestimation of [??][O.sub.2] using the Haldane transformation of 2 to 3%.