Haemophilus


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Haemophilus

 [he-mof´ĭ-lus]
a genus of hemophilic gram-negative bacteria. H. aphro´philus, H. parainfluen´zae, and H. paraphro´-philus are part of the normal oral flora and are occasionally associated with endocarditis. Pathogenic species include H. aegyp´tius, the cause of pinkeye (acute contagious conjunctivitis); H. ducrey´i, the cause of chancroid; and H. influen´zae, a species once thought to cause epidemic influenza. A species formerly called H. vagina´lis is now called Gardnerella vaginalis. H. influenzae type b, rather than causing influenza, can cause meningitis, pneumonia, and serious throat and ear infections, particularly in children under the age of five years; vaccination against it is recommended for all children.

Haemophilus

(hē-mof'i-lŭs), Avoid the misspelling Hemophilus.
A genus of aerobic to facultatively anaerobic, nonmotile bacteria (family Brucellaceae) containing minute, gram-negative, rod-shaped cells that sometimes form threads and are pleomorphic. These organisms are strictly parasitic, growing best, or only, on media containing blood. They may or may not be pathogenic. They occur in various lesions and secretions, as well as in normal respiratory tracts, of vertebrates. The type species is Haemophilus influenzae.
[G. haima, blood, + philos, fond]

Haemophilus

Microbiology A genus of nonmotile gram-negative rods that require blood for growth and cause RTIs, meningitis, and STDs

Hae·moph·i·lus

(hē-mof'i-lŭs)
A genus of aerobic to facultatively anaerobic, nonmotile bacteria (family Brucellaceae) containing minute, gram-negative, rod-shaped cells that sometimes form threads and are pleomorphic. These organisms are strictly parasitic, growing best, or only, on media containing blood. They may or may not be pathogenic. They occur in various lesions and secretions, as well as in normal respiratory tracts, of vertebrates. The type species is H. influenzae.
[G. haima, blood, + philos, fond]

Haemophilus

A genus of small GRAM NEGATIVE rod-shaped micro-organisms that includes H. influenzae which can cause MENINGITIS, H. haemolyticus which is often found in the throat, and the causative organism of CHANCROID, H. ducreyi .

Hae·moph·i·lus

(hē-mof'i-lŭs)
A genus of aerobic to facultatively anaerobic, nonmotile, parasitic bacteria containing minute, gram-negative, rod-shaped cells; occur in various lesions and secretions, as well as in normal respiratory tracts, of vertebrates.
[G. haima, blood, + philos, fond]
References in periodicals archive ?
Invasive disease caused by Haemophilus influenzae in Sweden 1997-2009; evidence of increasing incidence and clinical burden of non-type b strains.
Haemophilus influenzae Type B Infections - Products under Development by Companies 16
Haemophilus influenza colonies on chocolate agar and blood agar plates enriched with factors X and D are convex, smooth, white-gray, and transparent.
Haazen et al., "Phase I, randomized, observer-blind, placebo-controlled studiesto evaluate the safety, reactogenicity and immunogenicity of an investigational non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) protein vaccine in adults," Vaccine, vol.
Spectrum of invasive Haemophilus influenzae type b disease in adults.
Simultaneous detection of Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae, and Streptococcus pneumoniae in suspected cases of meningitis and septicemia using real-time PCR.
* The report reviews pipeline therapeutics for Haemophilus influenzae Type B Infections by companies and universities/research institutes based on information derived from company and industry-specific sources
* PedvaxHib (Haemophilus b Conjugate Vaccine [Meningococcal Protein Conjugate] manufactured by Merck & Co., Kenilworth, NJ) (http://www.
Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a small, fastidious gram-negative coccobacillus that colonizes the human pharynx, the only known natural reservoir.
Patients with asplenia are at significant increased risk of sepsis due to encapsulated bacteria, such as Haemophilus spp., Neisseria spp., and Streptococcus pneumoniae [20].
* The report reviews key players involved in the therapeutics development for Haemophilus Influenzae Type b Infections and enlists all their major and minor projects