Haemophilus


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Haemophilus: haemophilia, Haemophilus influenzae type b, Haemophilus ducreyi, Haemophilus parainfluenzae, Hæmophilia

Haemophilus

 [he-mof´ĭ-lus]
a genus of hemophilic gram-negative bacteria. H. aphro´philus, H. parainfluen´zae, and H. paraphro´-philus are part of the normal oral flora and are occasionally associated with endocarditis. Pathogenic species include H. aegyp´tius, the cause of pinkeye (acute contagious conjunctivitis); H. ducrey´i, the cause of chancroid; and H. influen´zae, a species once thought to cause epidemic influenza. A species formerly called H. vagina´lis is now called Gardnerella vaginalis. H. influenzae type b, rather than causing influenza, can cause meningitis, pneumonia, and serious throat and ear infections, particularly in children under the age of five years; vaccination against it is recommended for all children.

Haemophilus

(hē-mof'i-lŭs), Avoid the misspelling Hemophilus.
A genus of aerobic to facultatively anaerobic, nonmotile bacteria (family Brucellaceae) containing minute, gram-negative, rod-shaped cells that sometimes form threads and are pleomorphic. These organisms are strictly parasitic, growing best, or only, on media containing blood. They may or may not be pathogenic. They occur in various lesions and secretions, as well as in normal respiratory tracts, of vertebrates. The type species is Haemophilus influenzae.
[G. haima, blood, + philos, fond]

Haemophilus

/Hae·moph·i·lus/ (he-mof´ĭ-lus) a genus of hemophilic gram-negative bacteria (family Pasteurellaceae) including H. aegyp´ticus, the cause of acute contagious conjunctivitis; H. ducrey´i, the cause of chancroid; H. influen´zae (once thought to be the cause of epidemic influenza), the cause of lethal meningitis in infants; and H. vagina´lis, associated with, and possibly the cause of, vaginitis.

Haemophilus

[hēmof′iləs]
Etymology: Gk, haima, blood, philein, to love
a genus of gram-negative rod-shaped pathogenic bacteria, frequently found in the respiratory tract of humans and other animals. Examples are H. influenzae, which causes respiratory tract infections and one form of meningitis; H. haemolyticus, a hemolytic species pathogenic in the upper respiratory tract of humans; and H. ducreyi, which causes chancroid. Haemophilus species are generally sensitive to cephalosporins, tetracyclines, and sulfonamides.

Haemophilus

Microbiology A genus of nonmotile gram-negative rods that require blood for growth and cause RTIs, meningitis, and STDs

Hae·moph·i·lus

(hē-mof'i-lŭs)
A genus of aerobic to facultatively anaerobic, nonmotile bacteria (family Brucellaceae) containing minute, gram-negative, rod-shaped cells that sometimes form threads and are pleomorphic. These organisms are strictly parasitic, growing best, or only, on media containing blood. They may or may not be pathogenic. They occur in various lesions and secretions, as well as in normal respiratory tracts, of vertebrates. The type species is H. influenzae.
[G. haima, blood, + philos, fond]

Haemophilus

A genus of small GRAM NEGATIVE rod-shaped micro-organisms that includes H. influenzae which can cause MENINGITIS, H. haemolyticus which is often found in the throat, and the causative organism of CHANCROID, H. ducreyi .

Hae·moph·i·lus

(hē-mof'i-lŭs)
A genus of aerobic to facultatively anaerobic, nonmotile, parasitic bacteria containing minute, gram-negative, rod-shaped cells; occur in various lesions and secretions, as well as in normal respiratory tracts, of vertebrates.
[G. haima, blood, + philos, fond]

Haemophilus

a genus of hemophilic gram-negative coccobacilli or rod-shaped bacteria.

Haemophilus agni
see H. somnus now called Histophilussomni.
Haemophilus avium
now called Avibacteriumavium.
Haemophilus bovis
see moraxellabovis.
Haemophilus equigenitalis
see taylorella equigenitalis.
Haemophilus gallinarum
now classified as Avibacteriumparagallinarum.
Haemophilus haemoglobinophilus
found on canine genitalia; sometimes linked to puppy mortality but not often a cause of disease.
Haemophilus influenzaemurium
the cause of respiratory disease and conjunctivitis in mice.
Haemophilus ovis
now called Histophilus somni.
Haemophilus paracuniculus
may be associated with mucoid enteropathy in rabbits.
Haemophilus paragallinarum
now called Avibacteriumparagallinarum.
Haemophilus parahemolyticus (syn. Haemophilus pleuropneumoniae)
see actinobacilluspleuropneumoniae.
Haemophilus parainfluenzae
reputed to cause a syndrome in pigs similar to Glasser's disease (H. suis, H. parasuis).
Haemophilus parasuis
a common concurrent infection with swine influenza virus and causes glasser's disease of swine.
Haemophilus piscium
a cause of ulceration of the gills and mouth of trout.
Haemophilus somnus
now called Histophilus somni.
Haemophilus suis
now classified as H. parasuis (above).
References in periodicals archive ?
High antibody responses to booster doses of either Haemophilus influenzae capsular polysaccharide or conjugate vaccine after primary immunization with conjugate vaccines.
Combined DTP-HBV-HIB vaccine versus separately administered DTP-HBV and HIB vaccines for primary prevention of diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, hepatitis B and Haemophilus influenzae B (HIB).
Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) disease is caused by a bacterium that enters the body through the nose or throat and then can spread to cause meningitis (an infection of the coverings of the brain and spinal cord), blood stream infection, pneumonia, infection of the epiglottis, and other serious infections.
Coverage of the Haemophilus Influenzae Infections pipeline on the basis of route of administration and molecule type.
Simultaneous PCR detection of Haemophilus ducreyi, Treponema pallidum, and herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 from genital ulcers.
Figure 6 7: Worldwide - Haemophilus Influenzae Type B Vaccine Introduction in High & Low-Income Countries, 1980 - 2010
A high degree of natural immunologic priming to the capsular polysaccharide may not prevent Haemophilus influenzae type b meningitis.
The report identifies the key trends shaping and driving the global Haemophilus influenzae type B vaccine Therapeutics market.
Correct identification of bacteria of the genus Haemophilus at the species level, including H.
Benefits of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine are primarily limited to children of the developed part of the world mainly for lack of convincing local disease burden data from the developing countries.