habitat

(redirected from Habitats)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia.

habitat

[hab′itat]
Etymology: L, habitare, to dwell
a natural environment where an organism, including a human being, may live and grow normally.

habitat

that part of the environment, for example, stream, meadowland, salt marsh, etc., which is occupied by an animal or plant.

habitat

the environment inhabited by a specific organism or animal.
References in periodicals archive ?
Habitats: Habitat names delineated were the Mudflat, Beach and Reedbed Habitat Type (MBR), Riparian Forest Habitat Type (RF) and Fringe Terrestrial Habitat Type (FT).
We used the CoRT Breadth thinking skills (de Bono, 2000) to teach students problem-based learning of bird habitat adaptations.
The highest level or Platinum Tier Service is offered to landlords who commit Citi habitats as their exclusive agency and includes all services of Silver and Gold Tiers, and adds asset management consultations, designated preferred Citi Habitats agents, comprehensive pricing analysis with a stacking plan, primary placement on Citi Habitats web site and several other service features.
Also, logging companies deforest (cut down and remove trees) vast areas of ape habitat to collect wood to sell.
The 2001 critical habitat proposal, challenged by the building industry, was set aside by a federal judge.
Educators are noticing the academia social and practical benefits of incorporating schoolyard habitats into everyday learning, especially in elementary schools, but also in middle and high schools.
The agency's Ventura office is determining critical habitat for the arroyo toad.
Approximately 600 acres at the site are being managed as an enhanced habitat for wildlife.
As the first of our adopted butterflies flew off to their new home, an editorial appeared in The New York Times about the endangered monarch butterfly habitat in Mexico.
Now, along 25 acres of the creek's north bank, pollution has been replaced by oak, sycamore and ash saplings, the beginnings of a riparian habitat that once thrived in the area.
Working with limited resources, refuge personnel at every level of the system need to sensitively balance a myriad of environmental problems to preserve these habitats that are vital to the survival of America's unique natural heritage.