spherocytosis, hereditary, type 2

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spherocytosis, hereditary, type 2

An autosomal dominant haematologic disorder (OMIM:182870) characterised by numerous abnormally shaped, generally spheroid erythrocytes accompanied by severe haemolytic anaemia. 

Molecular pathology
Caused by defects of SPTB, which encodes beta spectrin, a major constituent of the cytoskeletal network underlying the red cell plasma membrane.
References in periodicals archive ?
Plans for the urban quarter around the HS2 Interchange station
It also builds on our earlier decision to bring the benefits of HS2 to Crewe from 2027 - 6 years earlier than originally planned - as well as allowing the benefits of a high-speed service to extend to Stoke-on-Trent.
As Britain's new railway, HS2 will deliver vital links between some of our country's biggest cities, driving economic growth and productivity and helping to deliver the Government's Industrial Strategy.
UK Government Minister for Wales, Guto Bebb MP, said: "The improved connections between North Wales, northern England and the Midlands that HS2 will bring can help deliver significant economic benefits to communities on both sides of the border.
HS2 cement of Central "I visited Newcastle six months ago and met with an gateway North the council leader Nick Forbes and business representatives.
HS2 said: "There are no technical barriers to our specification for a classic-compatible train to have the same high-speed performance as a captive train running only on HS2.
HS2 trains are due to start running between London and Birmingham in 2026.
David Meechan, HS2 Ltd spokesman, said: "Britain desperately needs this new high speed rail network to boost rail capacity and improve links between our biggest cities.
chamber head of police Steven Leigh, said: "We are pleased to see that the committee has agued that there is a strong case for improving trans-Pennine links or building the northern legs of HS2 rst, both of which could be a better improving northern links, it is argued way of rebalancing the economy than building the southern leg of HS2.
They further argued that cutting the speed of the HS2 trains from 250mph to 200mph would reduce the cost, as would terminating the southern end of the line at Old Oak Common in north west London rather than at Euston.
Commenting on the report, the committee's chairman Lord Hollick said: "At PS50 billion HS2 will be one of the most expensive infrastructure projects ever undertaken in the UK but the Government have not yet made a convincing case for why it is necessary.