HR


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hour

 [our]
1. the time something occurs.
2. a unit of time, being 60 minutes, or 3600 seconds.
3. a unit of educational credit.
contact hour a unit of credit for educational offerings, based on a mathematical formula. Continuing education programs that wish to award contact hours are carefully reviewed by the health care professionals for which the educational experience is designed.
golden hour the first hour following a traumatic injury. See golden hour.

HR

abbr.
1. heart rate
2. House of Representatives
3. home rule
4. home run
5. human resources

hr

abbreviation for hour.

HR

Abbreviation for:
haematologic remission
haemorrhagic retinopathy
hairpin ribozyme
hazard ratio
heart rate
heat resistant
high responder
high risk
histamine release
histamine receptor
homing receptor
homologous repeat
hormone receptor
hospital record
hospital report
hospitalisation rate
hour
human recombinant
human resources or personnel 
hyperimmune reaction
hypersensitivity reaction
hypersensitivity response
hypoxic response

hazard ratio

(haz′ărd),

HR

1. In biostatistics, the calculated likelihood that a particular intervention will make a study outcome more or less likely to occur. A hazard ratio of 1.0 indicates that the variable has no impact on the outcome. A hazard ratio of less than 1.0 indicates that the variable decreases the likelihood of the outcome. A ratio exceeding 1.0 indicates that the variable increases the likelihood of the outcome. A ratio of 2.0 suggests that the variable doubles the likelihood of the outcome. A ratio of 0.5 suggests that it halves the risk of the outcome.
2. The likelihood that a group of people who are exposed to an event, toxin, or treatment will experience poor health, relative to a group of people who are not similarly exposed.

rate

(rat) [L. rata, calculated]
The speed or frequency of occurrence of an event, usually expressed with respect to time or some other known standard.

acquisition rate

In radiology, the speed with which medical images are recorded, usually expressed in images per second.

attack rate

The rate of occurrence of new cases of a disease.

basal metabolic rate

Abbreviation: BMR
The metabolic rate as measured 12 hr after eating, after a restful sleep, with no exercise or activity preceding testing, with elimination of emotional excitement, and at a comfortable temperature. It is usually expressed in terms of kilocalories per square meter of body surface per hour. It increases, for example, in hyperthyroidism. Synonym: resting energy expenditure

baseline fetal heart rate

Abbreviation: FHR
The average range of beats per minute recorded within a 10-min time frame. The normal range is between 120 and 160 beats per minute.

birth rate

The number of live births per 1000 in the population in a given year.

case rate

Morbidity rate.

case fatality rate

The percentage of individuals afflicted with an illness who die as a result of it.

concordance rate

The frequency with which a gene will be inherited or expressed by identical or fraternal twins.

death rate

The number of deaths in a specified population, usually expressed per 100,000 population over a given period, usually 1 year. Synonym: death-to-case ratio; mortality rate

delivery rate

In assisted reproduction technology, the number of newborn deliveries achieved in every one hundred follicular aspirations, embryo transfers, or stimulated cycles.

dose rate

The quantity of medicine or radiation administered per unit of time.

erythrocyte sedimentation rate

Abbreviation: ESR
See: sedimentation rate

false-negative rate

The rate of occurrence of negative test results in those who have the attribute or disease for which they are being tested.

false-positive rate

The rate of occurrence of positive test results in those who do not have the attribute or disease for which they are being tested.

fertility rate

The number of births per year per 1000 women between ages 15 and 44 in a given population.

fetal mortality rate

The number of fetal deaths per 1000 live births, usually per year.

growth rate

The rate at which an individual, tissue, or organ grows over time.

heart rate

Abbreviation: HR
The number of heartbeats per unit of time, usually expressed or written as number per minute. A normal resting heart rate for an adult is 60–100 beats per minute.

infant mortality rate

The number of deaths per year of live-born infants less than 1 year of age divided by the number of live births in the same year. This value is usually expressed as deaths per 100,000 live births.
See: neonatal mortality rate; perinatal mortality rate

infusion rate

The speed of administration of a solution in mL/hr.

CAUTION!

It is calculated by the following formula: Rate = (Dose × 60 × Body weight)/Concentration, in which the dose is in mcg/kg/min; 60 is in min/hr; weight is in kg; and the concentration of the substance in solution is in mcg/mL.
Enlarge picture
CAUSES OF MATERNAL DEATH

maternal mortality rate

The number of maternal deaths in 1 year from puerperal causes (such as those associated with pregnancy, childbirth, and the puerperium) within 42 days after delivery divided by the number of live births in that same year. This value is usually expressed as deaths per 100,000 live births. See: illustration

maximum midexpiratory flow rate

Abbreviation: MMFR
The average airflow during the middle half of a forced vital capacity effort.

metabolic rate

The rate of utilization of energy. This is usually measured at a time when the subject is completely at rest and in a fasting state. Energy used is calculated from the amount of oxygen used during the test.
See: basal metabolic rate; basal metabolism

morbidity rate

The number of cases per year of certain diseases in relation to the size of the population in which they occur. Synonym: case rate

mortality rate

Death rate.

neonatal mortality rate

The number of deaths in 1 year of infants aged 0 to 28 days divided by the number of live births in that same year.
See: maternal mortality rate; perinatal mortality rate

peak expiratory flow rate

The maximum rate of exhalation during a forced expiration, measured in liters per second or liters per minute. It is used as a test of airway obstruction.

perinatal mortality rate

The number of stillbirths (in which the gestation period was 28 weeks or more) in the first 7 days of life divided by the number of live births plus stillbirths in the same year. This value is usually expressed as deaths per 100,000 live births plus stillbirths.
See: infant mortality rate; neonatal mortality rate

periodontal disease rate

See: periodontal (Ramfjord) index

pulse rate

The number of heartbeats per unit of time that can be detected by palpating any accessible artery.

respiration rate

The number of breaths per unit of time.

sedimentation rate

Abbreviation: ESR (erythrocyte sedimentation rate)
A nonspecific laboratory test used as a marker of inflammation. In this test the speed at which erythrocytes settle out of unclotted blood is measured. Blood to which an anticoagulant has been added is placed in a long, narrow tube, and the distance the red cells fall in 1 hr is the ESR. Normally it is less than 10 mm/hr in men and slightly higher in women.

The speed at which the cells settle depends on how many red blood cells clump together. Clumping is increased by the presence of acute-phase proteins released during inflammation.

specific absorption rate

The rate at which electromagnetic energy is absorbed by a kilogram of tissue, usually expressed as the heat absorbed by the tissue, or as the power absorbed per unit of mass.

ventilation rate

Abbreviation: VR
The number of breaths per minute.

heart rate

Abbreviation: HR
The number of heartbeats per unit of time, usually expressed or written as number per minute. A normal resting heart rate for an adult is 60–100 beats per minute.
See also: rate

HR

heart rate

HR,


HR,

n hold-relax; a proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) technique that involves stretching and relaxing taut muscles. See also PNF.

HR

heart rate.

hr

hour.

Patient discussion about HR

Q. my mm/hr is 73 I know that normal is 20 what do i do? I had blood work and my mm/hr is high what must be the reason for this ?

A. Well, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (that can you read more about it in wiki http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erythrocyte_sedimentation_rate) isn't a very specific test: it may be elevated in many situations, both more and less significant. It may be elevated in pregnancy, people with overweight and it's influenced by other things in your blood.

IMHO, the most important thing is whether you have other complaints or abnormal tests. If you don't have any other problem than these results may mean nothing. However, you should check with your doctor about the other tests.

Take care,

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