HPV4

HPV4

A vaccine that provides protection against infection with four types of human papilloma virus (HPV), specifically, types 6, 11, 16, and 18.
References in periodicals archive ?
A new study in the Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ) found no increased risk of autoimmune disorders in girls who received quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV4) vaccination, adding to the body of evidence for the safety of the vaccine.
MONDAY, July 30, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Following quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV4) vaccination, girls age 12 to 17 years do not have increased risk of autoimmune disorders, according to a study published recently in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.
The quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV4) vaccine is effective at protecting against 90 percent of the strains that cause cervical and anal cancer.
FDA licensure of quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV4, Gardasil) for use in males and guidance from the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP).
Three effective vaccines are approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA): the bivalent vaccine (HPV2), which protects against HPV types 16 and 18; the tetravalent vaccine (HPV4), which protects against types 16, 18, 6, and 11; the 9-valent vaccine (HPV9), which protects against types 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58 [6, 7].
Namely, in sporadic cases of common warts concurrent infections with two or more HPV types can be identified, including their well-known etiological agents, such as HPV1, HPV2, HPV4, HPV7, HPV27, HPV57, and HPV65 (3, 7, 10, 26, 32).
Licensed in December 2014, HPV9 added 5 high-risk HPV antigens to the quadrivalent HPV vaccine (HPV4).
Furthermore, all HPV nomenclature in the 2016 recommendations will be updated to reflect currently accepted naming formats; for example, HPV4 will now be called 4-valent or 4V HPV In the footnotes, the 9-valent HPV vaccine is now included along with the 5-valent and 4-valent variants, along with restructured language to clarify administration instructions.
for protection against certain HPV viruses, namely, HPV4 and HPV2 vaccines (Markowitz et al., 2014).
Both the quadrivalent (HPV4) and bivalent (HPV2) vaccines protect against HPV types 16 and 18, which cause 70% of cervical cancers; HPV4 also protects against HPV types 6 and 11, which cause 90% of genital warts (1,2).
* Zoster and human papillomavirus vaccines (either HPV2 or HPV4) are no longer specifically indicated for health care workers; instead, each should be provided to health care professionals and other patients who meet age and other indications.
Shortly thereafter in 2006, a new tetanus toxoid, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis vaccine (Tdap) was recommended, and in March 2007 the quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV4: types 6, 11, 16, and 18) was recommended for use in girls, starting at age 11-12 years, and young women up to 26 years of age.