HIV viral load


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Related to HIV viral load: CD4 count

HIV viral load

AIDS A measure of the amount of HIV RNA in blood, expressed as number of copies/mL of plasma. See AIDS, HIV.
References in periodicals archive ?
This new multistudy analysis is valuable because (1) it combines results of similar previous studies and thus provides strong conclusions, and (2) it clearly analyzes many details of precancer cervical changes in women with HIV, including the impact of antiretroviral therapy, CD4 count, and HIV viral load.
Blood analysis was conducted in order to determine CD4 lymphocyte count (quantified by flow cytometry analyzer, Becton Dickinson, USA) and HIV viral load (RT PCR Amplicor, Roche Diagnostics Corporation, Indianapolis, USA), both of which were assessed at baseline and three months after completion of therapy.
The most recent CD4 count and HIV viral load, when available, were recorded.
During the same period of time, rates of HIV viral load suppression doubled.
The patients' records were reviewed and a previously validated questionnaire was used to collect data on age, sex, mode of HIV transmission, antiretroviral drugs in use, date of the HIV-infection diagnosis, last CD4 cell count and HIV viral load, and hepatitis B surface antibody (anti-HBs) status.
Immunologic markers for HIV included cluster of differentiation 4 percentage (CD4%) counts and HIV viral load (ribonucleic acid[RNA] copies/mm3).
"These infections are likely to be particularly transmissible due to the high HIV viral load in early infection.
According to the contract, Abbott will provide its HIV viral load tests, which monitor the amount of HIV in a person's blood, at reduced prices to help provide access to quality care in high-burden countries affected by this virus.
During twice-yearly follow-up visits, the women provided clinical, obstetric and sexual behavior data; underwent a Pap test; and gave blood samples for assessment of CD4 cell count and HIV viral load, and cervical samples for HIV and HPV DNA testing.
Patient charts were reviewed for the CD4 cell count, CD4 percent, and HIV viral load at the time of the first appointment to each health care facility.
It is suggested that the CD4 count be documented and the HIV viral load be quantified in patients who already have the diagnosis of HIV infection.
There is abundant evidence that both bacterial and viral sexually transmitted infections (STIs) raise the HIV viral load of individuals not taking ART, increase viral shedding in the genital tract, and raise the likelihood of both transmission and acquisition of HIV on an individual and population level, though all but one of a number of studies found that presumptive treatment of STIs as a prevention method had no effect on HIV incidence rates.