HIV exceptionalism


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A stance in which health care policies favour the rights for privacy of HIV-infected individuals over concerns for public safety

HIV exceptionalism

Public health A stance in which health care policies favor the rights for privacy of HIV-infected individuals over concerns for public safety. See ACT-UP, AIDS advocacy, Behringer v Medical Center of Princeton.

HIV ex·cep·tion·al·ism

(ek-sep'shŭn-ăl-izm)
A concept whereby the privacy concerns of those infected with HIV are considered to be more important than public health concerns.
References in periodicals archive ?
Rethinking HIV exceptionalism: The ethics of opt-out HIV testing in sub-Saharan Africa.
It seems that their position can only be held if they subscribe to two types of 'exceptionalism': (i) HIV exceptionalism and (ii) South African exceptionalism.
In a private communication, the authors stated that there are at least four reasons for HIV Exceptionalism:
Second, the resulting HIV exceptionalism fuels and perpetuates stigma associated with HIV.
The criminalization of HIV transmission and exposure, without criminalizing the transmission of other infections, sexually transmitted or not, is not rational, and results in "HIV Exceptionalism," whereby HIV is treated differently than other health threats on the basis of its being perceived as "exceptional" and warranting different treatment.
Routine screening: informed consent, stigma and the waning of HIV exceptionalism. Am J Bioeth, 2006, 6, 5-8.
The view that genetics raises distinct issues is what Thomas Murray labeled "genetic exceptionalism," borrowing from the earlier term "HIV exceptionalism." (1) The issue of whether the use of genetic information should be addressed separately from other health information is not merely an academic concern, however.
(12) See Ronald Bayer, Public Health Policy and the AIDS Epidemic-An End to HIV Exceptionalism?, 324 New Eng.
An end to HIV exceptionalism?' (N Engl J Med 1991; 324: 1500-1504); see also Ronald Bayer and Claire Edington, 'HIV testing, human rights, and global AIDS policy: Exceptionalism and its discontents' (Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law 2009; 34(3)).
(10) See Ronald Bayer, Public Health Policy and the AIDS Epidemic: An End to HIV Exceptionalism?, 324 New Eng.
it was clear that a major epidemic had begun"); Ronald Bayer, Public Health Policy and the AIDS Epidemic: An End to HIV Exceptionalism?, 324 New Eng.