histone

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histone

 [his´tōn]
a simple protein, soluble in water and insoluble in dilute ammonia, found combined as salts with acidic substances, such as nucleic acids or the globin of hemoglobin.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

his·tone (H),

(his'tōn),
One of a number of simple proteins (often found in the cell nucleus); contains a high proportion of basic amino acids; soluble in water, dilute acids, and alkalies; and not coagulable by heat; for example, the proteins associated with nucleic acids in the nuclei of plant and animal tissues. They constitute about half the mass of the chromosomes of eukaryotic cells.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

histone

(hĭs′tōn′)
n.
Any of several basic proteins found in association with the DNA in the chromatin of eukaryotes.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

his·tone

(his'tōn)
One of a number of simple proteins (often found in the cell nucleus) containing a high proportion of basic amino acids, are soluble in water, dilute acids, and alkalies, and are not coagulable by heat.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

histone

a type of simple protein that is usually basic and tends to form complexes with nucleic acids (e.g. DNA) forming NUCLEOSOMES. CHROMOSOMES of EUKARYOTES contain large quantities of histones which may regulate DNA functioning in some way. The five major histones are represented as: H1, H2A, H2B, H3 and H4.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005