HEPA


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HEPA

(hĕp′ə)
abbr.
1. high-efficiency particulate air
2. high-efficiency particulate arresting
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

HEPA

Abbreviation for high-efficiency particulate air filters.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
(7) At its October 2018 meeting, ACIP added homelessness to the list of those (previously unvaccinated) who should receive the HepA vaccine (TABLE 2).
During February 2018-October 2018, the ACIP Hepatitis Vaccines Work Group ([section]) held monthly conference calls to review and discuss relevant scientific evidence ([paragraph]) supporting inclusion of homelessness as an indication for HepA vaccine.
Playing primarily the power forward spot, Hepa is ranked 66th in the US ESPN 100 rankings.
The 6-foot-9 Hepa saw action in the 2017 NBTC National High School Championship last March with Filam Sports USA, where he was named as the Defensive Player of the Tournament.
ARCHIVES: AESG launches HEPA filter testing service
The testing of HEPA and ULPA (MERV 17 through 20) filters is included in the Recommended Practice IEST-RP-CC001.5, HEPA and ULPA Filters.
AAF's HEPA and ULPA filters with NELIOR Filtration Technology provide value added through consistent air quality, improved process performance, environmental savings and beneficial Total Cost of Ownership.
Older canisters were often noisy and many did not have HEPA filtration.
A wide variety of PAC technologies, including those based on filtration (HEPA, electrets, or sorption), ionization (ion generation or plasma cluster), oxidation (ozone, or ultraviolet photocatalytic), electrostatic precipitation, and ultraviolet germicidal irradiation currently exist.
(1) A small, preliminary study suggests air purifiers equipped with high-efficiency particle air (HEPA) filters can lower the amount of indoor fine particulate matter ([PM.sub.2.5]) and smoke from woodstoves, potentially reducing residents' risk of cardiovascular disease from exposure to these air pollutants.
Researchers from Canada, who studied healthy adults living in a small community in British Columbia where wood burning stoves are the main sources of pollution, found that high efficiency particle air (HEPA) filters reduced the amount of airborne particulate matter, resulting in improved blood vessel health and reductions in blood markers that are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease.he researchers recruited 45 adults from 25 homes.