HCN1

HCN1

A gene on chromosome 11q12 that encodes a protein which removes 5' overhanging flaps in DNA repair, and processes the 5' ends of Okazaki
fragments in lagging-strand DNA synthesis. Direct physical interaction between FEN1 and AP endonuclease 1 during long-patch base excision repair provides co-ordinated loading of the proteins onto the substrate, passing substrate from one enzyme to another. FEN1 belongs to the XPG/RAD2 endonuclease family and is one of 10 proteins essential for cell-free DNA replication.
References in periodicals archive ?
(1) In short, Gene Ontology analysis has identified several potentially affected pathways involved in synaptic transmission (HTR2A, BDNF, CHRNA3, CHRNB4, DRD1, DRD2, DRD4, EGR1, GRIA4, GRIN2B, GRM3, NISCH, SLC1A3, and ERBB4), dopamine metabolic processes (COMT, DRD1, DRD2, DRD4, MAOA, NR4A2, and SLC6A3), and ion channel activity (CHRNA7, CACNA1I, CACNB2, CHRNA3, CHRNA5, CHRNB4, GABRB3, GRIA4, GRIA1, GRIN2B, HCN1, CACNA1C, KCTD13, KCNV1, KCNN3, KCNJ13, and KCNB1).
Expression of Hcn1 (4-fold) and Hcn4 (5-fold) were downregulated in GK compared to control SAN.
Hcn4 (HCN4) and to a lesser extent Hcn1 (HCN1) were downregulated in GK compared to control SAN.
Reid, "Spike-and-wave discharge mediated reduction in hippocampal HCN1 channel function associates with learning deficits in a genetic mouse model of epilepsy," Neurobiology of Disease, vol.
Millipore, Germany); against HCN1 (RTQ-7C3, raised in rat, 1:10; F.
Calcium-dependent binding of HCN1 channel protein to hair cell stereociliary tip link protein protocadherin 15 CD3.
Specifically, they explored an ion channel called HCN1, which is suppressed in response to brain seizures, injuries and infections that lead to epilepsy, hoping to find the long-sought mechanism that triggers epileptic activity in previously normal brain cells.
In their study the researchers reveal that mechanism: The HCN1 channel gene and about three dozen other important genes are altered by a major cellular repressor called NRSF, which increases after events that give rise to epilepsy.
During the third postnatal week, HCN channels contain predominantly HCN1, which produces faster channel dynamics and less sensitivity to cAMP (Surges et al., 2006).