hydrogen peroxide

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hydrogen

 (H) [hi´dro-jen]
a chemical element, atomic number 1, atomic weight 1.00797. (See Appendix 6.) It exists as the mass 1 isotope (protium, or light or ordinary hydrogen), mass 2 isotope (deuterium, heavy hydrogen), and mass 3 isotope (tritium).
hydrogen cyanide an extremely poisonous colorless liquid or gas, HCN, a decomposition product of various naturally occurring glycosides and a common cause of cyanide poisoning. Inhalation of the gas can cause death within a minute. Called also hydrocyanic acid.
heavy hydrogen deuterium.
hydrogen ion concentration the degree of concentration of hydrogen ions (the acid element) in a solution. Its symbol is pH, and it expresses the degree to which a solution is acidic or alkaline. The pH range extends from 0 to 14, pH 7 being neutral, a pH of less than 7 indicating acidity, and one above 7 indicating alkalinity. See also acid-base balance.
hydrogen peroxide H2O2, an antiseptic with a mildly antibacterial action. A 3 per cent solution foams on touching skin or mucous membrane and appears to have a mechanical cleansing action.
hydrogen sulfide H2S, a poisonous gas with an offensive smell, released from decaying organic material, natural gas, petroleum, and sulfur deposits, and sometimes used as a chemical reagent.

hy·dro·gen pe·rox·ide

an unstable compound readily broken down to water and oxygen, a reaction catalyzed by various powdered metals and by the enzyme, catalase; a 3% solution is used as a mild antiseptic for skin and mucous membranes.

hydrogen peroxide

n.
A colorless, heavy, strongly oxidizing liquid, H2O2, capable of reacting explosively with combustibles and used principally in aqueous solution as a mild antiseptic, bleaching agent, oxidizing agent, and laboratory reagent.

hy·dro·gen pe·rox·ide

(hīdrō-jen pĕr-oksīd)
Unstable compound readily broken down to water and oxygen, a reaction catalyzed by various powdered metals and by the enzyme, catalase.
Synonym(s): hydroperoxide.

hydrogen peroxide

A powerful oxidizing and antibacterial agent. It is formulated as a cream for external use on skin infections, ulcers and pressure sores. Brand names are Crystacide and Hioxyl.

Hydrogen peroxide

A colorless, unstable compound of hydrogen and oxygen (H2O2). An aqueous solution of hydrogen peroxide is used as an antiseptic and bleaching agent.
Mentioned in: Ozone Therapy

antiseptic 

An agent that kills or prevents the growth of bacteria. This term is generally restricted to agents that are sufficiently non-toxic for superficial application to living tissues. These include the preservatives for eye drops and contact lens solutions. Examples of antiseptics are alcohol, benzalkonium chloride, cetrimide, chlorbutanol, chlorhexidine, hydrogen peroxide, thimerosal (or thiomersalate). Other agents that are too toxic to be applied to living tissues are called disinfectants and are used to sterilize instruments and apparatus. See disinfection; ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid; neutralization; sterilization.

hy·dro·gen pe·rox·ide

(hīdrō-jen pĕr-oksīd)
Unstable compound readily broken down to water and oxygen used as a mild antiseptic for skin and mucous membranes.
References in periodicals archive ?
Exposure of cardiomyocytes to exogenous H202 resulted in a significant depletion of the intracellular ATP concentration (5 [+ or -] 1%, p<0.0001) (Fig.
2002), which may imply that H202 could be a biologically relevant method of induction for the development of models for COPD-related studies in vitro and in vivo.
Apomorphine enantiomers protect cultured pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells from oxidative stress induced by H202 and 6-hydroxydopamine.
The ability of vitamin C to generate H202 in tumors apparently hinges on the presence of unknown catalysts that can transfer electrons from vitamin C to 02 molecules, generating the unstable compound superoxide.
The mechanism appears to be intracellular accumulation of H202 with low catalase enzyme activity native to cancer cells.
The cell viability of L929 fibroblast cells pretreated with WEAl-B (2.5-0.08 [micro]g/m1) after H202 treatment was found to be 94-80% (Fig.
It has been also reported that American ginseng prevents Fe-EDTA and H202 induced plasmid DNA strand scissions because of the lipid-soluble and water-soluble antioxidant activity of the constituents (Kitts et al.