Gymnodinium


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Gymnodinium

(jim'nō-din'ē-ŭm),
Genus of marine dinoflagellates that includes the unicellular organism that causes red tide.

Gym·no·din·i·um

(jim-nŏ-din'ē-um)
Genus of marine dinoflagellates that includes the unicellular organism that causes red tide.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cleve) Heiden (Garate-Lizarraga et al., 2006a; 2007b.) Seasonal variations of toxic species, such as Gymnodinium catenatum and the degree of toxicity have already been determined (Garate-Lizarraga et al., 2004b; 2005) for blooms in this bay.
For example, Karenia brevis (ex Gymnodinium breve, ex Ptychodiscus brevis), which causes red tides in Florida, produces brevetoxins--neurotoxins responsible for neurotoxic shellfish poison (NSP)--in humans that consume contaminated shellfish (Poli et al., 1986; Morohashi et al, 1999).
Karenia brevis (formerly known as Gymnodinium breve and Ptychodiscus brevis) and related species are dinoflagellates that can form HABs known as "Florida red tides." Arrival of these HABs, often more green, brown, or dark-colored than red, is an annual event in the Gulf of Mexico, and these blooms have been observed as far north as North Carolina.
These outbreaks were caused by several species of toxic and non toxic dinoflagellates and diatoms associated mainly to blooms of Cochlodinium catenatun, but with an outbreak of Gymnodinium catenatum located near the study site in November (Viquez & Hargraves 1995).
Characterization of paralytic shellfish toxins in seawater and sardines (Sardina pilchardus) during blooms of Gymnodinium catenatum.
Ultraviolet suncreens in Gymnodinium sanguineum (Dynophyceae): Mycosporine-like amino acids protect against inhibition of photosynthesis.
Metabolism and Toxinology of Florida's Red Tide Dinoflagellate Gymnodinium breve (PhD Thesis).
The effects of feeding Karlodinium veneficum (ply # 103; Gymnodinium veneficum Ballantine) to the blue mussel Mytilus edulis.
De acuerdo a Mucino (2010), el %PPR en una comunidad dominada por Trichodesmium erythraeum, Prorocentrum rhathymum y Paralia sulcata puede estar entre 55-70% y cuando la composicion de la comunidad cambia a un conjunto dominado por Thalassionema frauenfeldii, Gymnodinium catenatum y Trichodesmium erythraeum, el %PPR puede variar de 35 a 80%.
Entre las especies que se han reportado como productoras de toxinas en Mexico se mencionan a Gymnodinium catenatum Graham y Karenia brevis (Davis) Hensen et Moestrup, son atecadas o desnudas, y Pyrodinium bahamense var.