emotion

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emotion

 [e-mo´shun]
a state of arousal characterized by alteration of feeling tone and by physiologic behavioral changes. The external manifestation of emotion is called affect; a pervasive and sustained emotional state, mood. adj., adj emo´tional. The physical form of emotion may be outward and evident to others, as in crying, laughing, blushing, or a variety of facial expressions. However, emotion is not always reflected in one's appearance and actions even though psychic changes are taking place. Joy, grief, fear, and anger are examples of emotions.

e·mo·tion

(ē-mō'shŭn),
A strong feeling, aroused mental state, or intense state of drive or unrest, which may be directed toward a definite object and is evidenced in both behavior and in psychological changes, with accompanying autonomic nervous system manifestations.
[L. e-moveo, pp. -motus, to move out, agitate]

emotion

(ĭ-mō′shən)
n.
1. A mental state that arises spontaneously rather than through conscious effort and is often accompanied by physiological changes; a feeling: the emotions of joy, sorrow, and anger.
2. Such mental states or the qualities that are associated with them, especially in contrast to reason: a decision based on emotion rather than logic.

emotion

Psychology A mood, affect or feeling of any kind–eg, anger, excitement, fear, grief, joy, hatred, love. See Negative emotion, Positive emotion, Toxic emotion.

e·mo·tion

(ē-mō'shŭn)
A strong feeling, aroused mental state, or intense state of drive or unrest directed toward a definite object and evidenced in both behavior and in psychologic changes, with accompanying autonomic nervous system manifestations.
[L. e-moveo, pp. -motus, to move out, agitate]

emotion

Any state of arousal in response to external events or memories of such events that affect, or threaten to affect, personal advantage. Emotion is never purely mental but is always associated with bodily changes such as the secretion of ADRENALINE and cortisol and their effects. The limbic system and the hypothalamus of the brain are the mediators of emotional expression and feeling. The external expression of emotional content is known as ‘affect’. Repressed emotions are associated with psychosomatic disease. The most important, in this context, are anger, a sense of dependency, and fear.

e·mo·tion

(ē-mō'shŭn)
A strong feeling, aroused mental state, or intense state of drive or unrest, which may be directed toward a definite object.
[L. e-moveo, pp. -motus, to move out, agitate]

Patient discussion about emotion

Q. Emotions My 68 years-old husband underwent his surgery for lung cancer several moths ago and after that received chemo. Thankfully, it seems that he’s on the right track, but then lately he’s being very emotional. He says he’s always been this way since the diagnosis, but he just hid it. We try to talk about it, but it seems we just don’t communicate. Any advice?

A. Hi,
Those above me already phrased very well what I wanted to write, so I’ll add a link to a site I found about this subject:
http://www.cancer.org/docroot/MBC/MBC_4x_Anxiety.asp?sitearea=MBC

Take care!

Q. What role does emotion have in the life of someone with autism? I just find the whole disorder of autism hard to understand because I'm a really emotional person. I'm especially interested in how people with mild autism or Asperger's can function fine but then when it comes to feeling empathy they have such trouble. I guess my question is how such people experience emotion--are these people actually unable to care about others? My intention is not to sound ignorant, I'm genuinely curious.

A. I have asperger's and most everything for me is logically analyzed and I have a difficulty knowing what emotion goes with certain situations and how the emotion manifests itself within me.
I care about others, I just cannot always put myself in their shoes and feel what they are feeling.

Q. discussing my father situation with the doctor My 82 years old dad has dementia, and currently lives with us at my home. For the last few weeks he's very nervous and sometimes yells and screams at us. I want to take him to the doctor and see if he can get any help, but I'm afraid that if I'll try to speak with doctor about this subject in front of my dad he'll take offense. What can I do? Thank you very much!

A. The answer above is a good suggestion. I would add to the letter a small warning about the way your father would react to a discussion of his behaviour so the doctor would know to discuss it carefully.

More discussions about emotion
References in periodicals archive ?
Perhaps that is why my "gut reaction" to your topic evokes so much emotion.
It's still a hard call but my gut reaction is that the omens are good for Ireland.
That was my gut reaction to a screening of artist Julian Schnabel's directorial debut.
WE SAY: Our gut reaction to this one when we saw the fixture list was draw - and we can't make a huge case for anyone to tip the balance.
That will be the gut reaction, certainly among many who have lost their jobs in the current economic gloom - and those Kirklees Council employees who now face the grim prospect of redundancy in the coming months.
The researchers concluded that people with strong moral convictions seem to not only base their trust in judgment on a gut reaction, "they do not trust even legitimate authorities to make the right decision in the first place."
My gut reaction to the Scotland fixtures he sorted out for the World Cup campaign was that he'd done a top job.
"My gut reaction is that this won't be a major setback, but I'll have to wait and see what the scan shows.
He is not as confident as he seems in public, and prefers to have the freedom to think and use his gut reaction to sort out the best options.
His gut reaction was to quit immediately after nine of his players - who deny all charge - were initially arrested in La Manga on Tuesday following serious sexual allegations by three German girls.
'I said to him, 'Please, are you going to look at it again, because I think your gut reaction was wrong?' Matheson confirmed he had dismissed Defoe for violent conduct, adding: 'It is not relevant whether he made contact or not.'
He said: "It was an urgent gut reaction that whoever it was had to get rid of her body.