guild

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guild

a group of species that exploits the same class of environmental resources in a similar way.
References in periodicals archive ?
Arabic and non-Arabic, printed and in manuscript, including the important Sharia court records, and applying a balanced methodology combining empirical and theoretical approaches, Nelly Hanna has produced a thorough, in-depth analysis of how Egypt's traditional economy based on the guild system had been able to engage in capitalist modes of diversification of capital investment and commercialization long before the impact of capitalist industrial Europe devastated Middle Eastern economies in the nineteenth century.
(34) Within the refuge of the liberties, such immigrants operating outside the guild system created informal networks of support, as they did in many English boroughs.
The MFA/creative writing system is a closed, undemocratic, medieval guild system that represses good writing.
Penty, a furniture designer who in 1906 published The Restoration of the Guild System. (15) Penty defended the "reintroduction of the small workshops, local markets" and fair prices set by the Guild members for their products.
A flourishing guild system and the frequent movement of craftsmen between major centres, bringing new ideas from elsewhere in Europe and Germany, helped encourage the highest standards of craftsmanship and spur competition.
These workers, which may have formed as much as a third of total population of Paris, operated in a wide range of crafts and typically worked within the guild system. These guilds, or corporations, were abolished in 1791, a move that sparked a debate which lasted for the next decades and which would not see a resolution until the period of the Restoration.
(11) Within the social order that the popes and the Church have espoused--a guild system of job security without usury where each family owns their abode, and so forth--government is probably not needed to perform this function.
Sheridan underlines the essential point: "This is another example of how 'skill' as we understand it had no objective value independent of the worker's gender and relationship (or lack of it) to the guild system" (111-12).