growth failure


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Related to growth failure: failure to thrive

growth failure

 
1. Dysplasia–Pediatrics, see there.
2. Failure to thrive, see there.
References in periodicals archive ?
Growth failure is persistent after birth and often resistant to supplemental feeding.
This case study highlights some of the complications of CKD observed in pediatric patients, including infection, fluid and electrolyte imbalance, metabolic acidosis, anemia, and growth failure. Nurses play a key role in caring for these patients by working with families to formulate appropriate inpatient and outpatient plans of care and providing ongoing education for patients and their families.
Crohn's disease can present as growth failure or sometimes masquerade as anorexia nervosa
Nutropin AQ (somatropin (rDNA origin) injection), a liquid formulation of growth hormone, was first approved for marketing in 1995 for the long-term treatment of children with GHD and growth failure associated with chronic renal insufficiency (CRI).
The child's doctor may recommend diet changes and food supplements to treat growth failure. Diet changes may include limiting foods that contain large amounts of phosphorus, like milk and other dairy products (except cream cheese and cottage cheese), meat, fish, and poultry.
One symptom of Rett Syndrome is profound growth failure. Pediatrician and nutritionist Kathleen J.
However, infant growth is also related to prenatal growth and while growth failure in early gestation reduces birth weight, growth failure in late gestation affects body proportions at birth and subsequent infant growth [17].
Recombinant hGH, a treatment for growth failure in children, Turner's Syndrome, and cachexia, a wasting condition associated with AIDS, is currently produced in bacteria.
For the most SCG-resistant PE-material (MDPE-16), the testing time exceeded 7 months (5074 h) before a slow crack growth failure occurred (80 [degrees] C).
(A few case histories are known of children whose long-term imprisonment in cellars and attics has been far better documented than that of Kaspar Hauser, but what those cases have to do with psychosocial dwarfism is a debatable point.) Recent research has suggested that growth failure in conditions of psychosocial adversity is a spectrum of disorders of which psychosocial dwarfism, as described here, is just one extreme.
The main goals of treatment, therefore, are to minimize growth failure and to reduce discomfort in an effective manner.
Stunting is a horrific early growth failure and has been described by the World Health Organization (WHO) as the most significant impediment to human development.