social psychology

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Related to Group psychology: social psychology

psychology

 [si-kol´o-je]
the science dealing with the mind and mental processes, especially in relation to human and animal behavior. adj., adj psycholog´ic, psycholog´ical.
analytic psychology (analytical psychology) the system of psychology founded by Carl Gustav Jung, based on the concepts of the collective unconscious and the complex.
clinical psychology the use of psychologic knowledge and techniques in the treatment of persons with emotional difficulties.
community psychology the application of psychological principles to the study and support of the mental health of individuals in their social sphere.
criminal psychology the study of the mentality, the motivation, and the social behavior of criminals.
depth psychology the study of unconscious mental processes.
developmental psychology the study of changes in behavior that occur with age.
dynamic psychology psychology stressing the causes and motivations for behavior.
environmental psychology study of the effects of the physical and social environment on behavior.
experimental psychology the study of the mind and mental operations by the use of experimental methods.
forensic psychology psychology dealing with the legal aspects of behavior and mental disorders.
gestalt psychology gestaltism; the theory that the objects of mind, as immediately presented to direct experience, come as complete unanalyzable wholes or forms that cannot be split into parts.
individual psychology the psychiatric theory of Alfred adler, stressing compensation and overcompensation for feelings of inferiority and the interpersonal nature of a person's problems.
physiologic psychology (physiological psychology) the branch of psychology that studies the relationship between physiologic and psychologic processes.
social psychology psychology that focuses on social interaction, on the ways in which actions of others influence the behavior of an individual.

social psychology

n.
The branch of psychology that deals with the behavior of groups and the influence of social factors on the individual.

social psychologist n.

social psychology

the study of the effects of group membership on the behavior, attitudes, and beliefs of the individual.

social psychology

The branch of psychology concerned with the study of groups and their influence on the individual's actions and mental processes.
See also: psychology
References in periodicals archive ?
Tansley not only adopted McDougall's model of instinct as the foundation for his model, which allowed him to incorporate a range of social emotions rather than restricting himself to Freud's concentration on the sexual instinct but, contrary to Freud's displacement of fellowship in group psychology in favour of the individual's relation to a leader, he endorsed the argument McDougall made that 'the development of the ego-complex in the mind of the individual is shown to be conditioned in all its phases by the individual's relation to his fellow man'.
To reduce the affective component of the self to cognitive interests, textual analysis, or legal and rational theory minimizes the importance of group psychology on power exchanges central to political life.
They devote their lives to studying individual and group psychology in relation to colour and colour trends.
Group psychology workshops - their support will be to strengthen the social skills of project participants and to build confidence in the group.
She also is the owner of Equilibria Psychological and Consultation Services, a mid-sized group psychology practice located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
In this book for knowledge workers and managers in businesses, nonprofits, and governmental agencies, Jackson (Edith Cowan University, Western Australia) draws on ideas from philosophy, group psychology, and the sociology of knowledge to explore the use of Web 2.
She reviews group psychology and cross-cultural issues, looking at the possibility of a cultural V-spot, and outlines treatment procedures for healing the wounds of emotional abuse.
Individual and group psychology always has been a critical, if widely overlooked, driver of financial activity.
However, these latter moves, part of an enthralling Freudian dance regarding group psychology and the ego, seem to me to veer wrongly.
While sociology, political philosophy, and group psychology may have something to say, he tends to treat their contributions as so partial that they are almost dismissed as inevitably distorting.

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