neoplasm

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neoplasm

 [ne´o-plazm]
tumor; any new and abnormal growth, specifically one in which cell multiplication is uncontrolled and progressive. Neoplasms may be benign or malignant.

ne·o·plasm

(nē'ō-plazm),
An abnormal tissue that grows by cellular proliferation more rapidly than normal and continues to grow after the stimuli that initiated the new growth cease. Neoplasms show partial or complete lack of structural organization and functional coordination with the normal tissue, and usually form a distinct mass of tissue that may be either benign (benign tumor) or malignant (cancer).
Synonym(s): new growth, tumor (2)
[neo- + G. plasma, thing formed]

neoplasm

/neo·plasm/ (ne´o-plazm) tumor; any new and abnormal growth, specifically one in which cell multiplication is uncontrolled and progressive. Neoplasms may be benign or malignant.

neoplasm

(nē′ə-plăz′əm)
n.
An abnormal new growth of tissue in animals or plants; a tumor.

ne′o·plas′tic (-plăs′tĭk) adj.

neoplasm

[nē′ōplaz′əm]
Etymology: Gk, neos + plasma, formation
any abnormal growth of new tissue, benign or malignant. Also called tumor. See also benign, cancer, malignant. neoplastic, adj.

neoplasm

(1) An abnormal mass of tissue, the growth of which exceeds and is uncoordinated with that of normal tissue, and persists in the same excessive manner after cessation of the stimuli evoking the change.
(2) Any autonomous proliferation of cells, benign or malignant.

Neoplasm classifications
• Behavior—Benign, borderline or malignant. 
• Degree of differentiation—Well differentiated (i.e., the neoplastic cell simulates its parent or progenitor cell) or poorly differentiated (i.e., the neoplastic cell is bizarre and “ugly”, as defined by pathologic criteria).
• Embryologic origin—Epithelial (e.g., adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma), lymphoproliferative (e.g., leukaemia, lymphoma), mesenchymal (e.g., sarcoma). 
• Gross appearance—Well circumscribed or infiltrative: benign neoplasms are usually slow growing, well circumscribed, often with a fibrous capsule, and are symptomatic only if they compromise a confined space (e.g., massive meningioma of the cranial cavity, or encirclement of vital blood vessels); malignancies are often aggressive with increased mitotic activity, bizarre cells, necrosis and invasion of adjacent structures, and have metastatic potential.

neoplasm

Oncology 'An abnormal mass of tissue, the growth of which exceeds and is uncoordinated with that of normal tissue and persists in the same excessive manner after cessation of the stimuli evoking the change'; an autonomous proliferation of cells, benign or malignant. See Cancer, Doubling time, Intraductal papillary-mucinous neoplasm of pancreas, Metastases, Papillary & solid neoplasm of pancreas.
Neoplasm classifications
Behavior Benign, borderline or malignant
Degree of differentiation Well-differentiated, ie the neoplastic cell simulates its parent or progenitor cell or poorly-differentiated, ie the neoplastic cell is bizarre and ''ugly', as defined by pathologic criteria'
Embryologic origin Epithelial–eg adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, lymphoproliferative–eg leukemia, lymphoma, mesenchymal–eg sarcoma, histiocytosis, neural crest–eg carcinoid tumor, some small cell carcinomas, etc
Gross appearance Well-circumscribed or infiltrative; benign neoplasms, usually slow-growing, well-circumscribed, often with a fibrous capsule, and are symptomatic only if they compromise a confined space, eg massive meningioma of the cranial cavity, or encirclement of vital blood vessels; malignancies are often aggressive with ↑ mitotic activity, bizarre cells, necrosis and invasion of adjacent structures and have metastatic potential

ne·o·plasm

(nē'ō-plazm)
An abnormal tissue that grows by cellular proliferation more rapidly than normal and continues to grow after the stimuli that initiated the new growth cease. Neoplasms show partial or complete lack of structural organization and functional coordination with the normal tissue, and usually form a distinct mass of tissue which may be either benign (benign tumor) or malignant (cancer).
Synonym(s): tumor (2) .
[G. neo- new + G. plasma, thing formed]

neoplasm

A collection of cells, derived from a common origin, often a single cell, that is increasing in number and expanding or spreading, either locally or to remote sites. A tumour. Neoplasms may be BENIGN or MALIGNANT. The term literally means a new growth. See also CANCER.

neoplasm

an autonomous growth of tissue in the body which has no apparent physiological function, such as a TUMOUR.

Neoplasm

An abnormal formation of tissue; for example, a tumor.

neoplasm (nēˈ·ō·plaˑ·zm),

n an abnormally growing tissue in the body, such as cancer.

ne·o·plasm

(nē'ō-plazm)
Abnormal tissue that grows by cellular proliferation more rapidly than normal and continues to grow after the stimuli that initiated the new growth cease; may be either benign or malignant.
[G. neo- new + G. plasma, thing formed]

neoplasm

1. a tumor.
2. any new and abnormal growth, specifically one in which cell multiplication is uncontrolled and progressive. Neoplasms may be benign or malignant. Neoplasms of particular organs and of particular cell types are to be found under their individual headings, e.g. pharyngeal, adenocarcinoma.

benign neoplasm
a neoplasm having none of the characteristics of a malignant neoplasm (see below), i.e. it grows slowly, expands without metastasis, and usually does not recur.
neoplasm fever
due to extensive necrosis in rapidly growing tumors.
histoid neoplasm
a neoplasm whose cells and organization resemble those of the tissue from which it is growing.
malignant neoplasm
a neoplasm with the characteristics of anaplasia, invasiveness and metastasis.
organoid neoplasm
a neoplasm whose cellular architecture resembles that of some organ in the body.
transmissible neoplasm
a neoplasm capable of being transmitted between individuals. Includes bovine viral leukosis, avian leukosis, rous sarcoma complex, marek's disease, canine transmissible venereal tumor, squamous cell carcinoma of cattle, and canine viral papillomatosis.

Patient discussion about neoplasm

Q. What is a brain tumor?

A. A brain tumour is any intracranial tumor normally either in the brain itself in the cranial nerves, in the brain envelopes, skull, pituitary and pineal gland, or spread from cancers primarily located in other organs (metastatic tumors). It is created by abnormal and uncontrolled cell division. Primary (true) brain tumors (which start in the brain) are commonly located in the posterior cranial fossa in children and in the anterior two-thirds of the cerebral hemispheres in adults, although they can affect any part of the brain.

Q. Is this a tumor? I felt a lump in my breast a few days ago in the shower. Is this a Tumor? Help! I'm scared.

A. If you felt a lump in your breast then you should go see your Doctor to check whether or not it is something that could be dangerous.

Q. what is carcinoid tumors? I had my appendix removed and the doctor came in the room very shocked and said it was full of carcinoid tumors. Im scared to get them somewhere else.

A. ya I have pain all the time but the doctors wont give me anything cuz im so young they don't want me hooked on anything. thank you sooo much for being so kind.

More discussions about neoplasm
References in periodicals archive ?
Gross appearance made a presumptive diagnosis as SCC.
The gross appearance of the appendix, presence of serous or purulent fluid in the right iliac fossa were noted, seeping out of serous peritoneal fluid upon opening the anterior parietal peritoneum or at mobilization of the ceacum or appendix was considered presence of excess peritoneal fluid .
05 compared to Japanese patients Table II Gross appearance of gastric cancers in Chinese and Japanese patients according to patients' gender Gross appearance Chinese gastric cancers n Female Male Early GC I 2 (0.
This hyperkeratosis is largely responsible for the characteristic shaggy or "hairy" gross appearance of the lesion.
By gross appearance they are classified as sessile, semisessile, flat, or pedunculated (Plates 1--4), and can be either neoplastic or nonneoplastic.
A marked change in milk towards normalcy was observed by third day while milk from all affected quarters was completely normal on gross appearance by fifth day of therapy.
A,B: A polypoid urethral mass in distal urethra C: The gross appearance of mass after excision.
1-3) It has a typical gross appearance of a well-circumscribed golden-yellow mass because of abundant cytoplasmic lipid in malignant cells.
The tumor is often large, but the gross appearance appears to vary, with cystic, solid and necrotic areas being present, and a fibrous pseudocapsule often surrounds the tumor, demarcating it from the pancreatic tissue.
While the presence of RBCs in fluids is significant and should be reported in the gross appearance description, the RBC count has no clinical significance.