maitake

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maitake

(mī-tä′kē, -kĕ)
n.
An edible polypore mushroom (Grifola frondosa) native to Japan and North America that produces large clusters of overlapping gray or brown fan-shaped caps, grows at the base of trees or in cultivation, and is prized in Japanese cuisine and used as a dietary supplement. Also called hen of the woods.

maitake

Herbal medicine
A mushroom (Grifola frondoa) that lowers blood pressure and enhances the immune system by increasing natural killer cell activity, increasing release of interleukin-1 and stimulating cytotoxic T cells; it inhibits growth of experimental tumours.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lee, "Effect of the degree of oxidation on the physicochemical and biological properties of Grifola frondosa polysaccharides," Carbohydrate Polymers, vol.
Grifola has also been used to prevent postoperative recurrence of bladder cancer.
Nanba, "Oral administration of soluble beta-glucans extracted from Grifola frondosa induces systemic antitumor immune response and decreases immunosuppression in tumor-bearing mice," International Journal of Cancer, vol.
This commercial product contains extracts from the mushrooms Agaricus blazei Murill (mycelium) (82.4%), Hericium erinaceus (14.7%), and Grifola frondosa (2.9%) and is produced by the company ACE Co.
Sugawara, "Monoclonal antibody to proteoglycan derived from Grifola frondosa (Maitake)," Biological and Pharmaceutical Bulletin, vol.
Biological activities of the polysaccharides produced from submerged culture of the edible Basidiomycete Grifola frondosa.
Kikuchi, Structures of New Ceramides from the Fruit Bodies of Grifola frondosa, Chem.
Nair, "Cyclooxygenase inhibitory and antioxidant compounds from the mycelia of the edible mushroom Grifola frondosa" Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, vol.
Hen-of-the-woods/maitake (Grifola frondosa), porcini (Boletus edulis), horse mushroom (Agaricus arvensis) bear's head tooth (Hericium coralloides) and beefsteak mushroom (Fistulina hepatica) were scarce.