ghrelin

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ghrel·in

(grel'in),
A naturally occurring 28-amino acid gut-brain growth hormone releasing peptide (GHRP) that is expressed mainly in the stomach and possibly in the hypothalamus. Fasting and hypoglycemia increase ghrelin levels and circulating ghrelin levels are decreased in chronic obesity, following acute caloric intake and in states of positive energy balance. Acute administration of ghrelin to humans induces a feeling of hunger. Ghrelin binds to ghrelin-receptors in the anterior pituitary and possibly in the mediobasal and mediolateral hypothalamus to stimulate growth hormone release and to regulate energy homeostasis. Serum levels of ghrelin are measurably higher in patients who have lost weight through dietary measures.
[growth hormone release + -in]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

ghrelin

(grĕl′ən)
n.
A hormone that is secreted by cells in the stomach and promotes hunger before an expected meal, decreases in amount after eating, and promotes secretion of growth hormone.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

ghrel·in

(grel'in)
A peptide hormone secreted by endocrine cells in the gastrointestinal tract. Acts as a growth hormone secretagogue and as an orexigenic agent mediated by the hypothalamic hormones neuropeptide Y (NPY) and agouti growth-related peptide (AGRP).
[growth hormone release + -in]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

ghrelin

A 28-amino acid peptide hormone that stimulates release of growth hormone from the anterior pituitary and has significant effects on appetite and energy balance. The main source of ghrelin is the epithelial cells of the fundus of the empty stomach. Recent studies have shown that, in mice, the hormone also interacts with the hippocampus and appears to improve memory and cognitive function.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Ghrelin

A recently discovered peptide hormone secreted by cells in the lining of the stomach. Ghrelin is important in appetite regulation and maintaining the body's energy balance.
Mentioned in: Obesity
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The researchers actually observed that the concentration of grehlin in the blood increases specifically in response to visual stimulation with food images.
People who habitually sleep for five hours were found to have 15% more grehlin than those who sleep for eight hours.
Grehlin, a recently described hormone, tells us we are hungry--time to eat.
b) Postprandial insulin, grehlin and glucose levels were significantly lower in the D40 trial compared to D10