greenhouse effect

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Related to Greenhouse warming: greenhouse effect

greenhouse effect

a theorized change in the earth's climate caused by accumulation of solar heat in the earth's surface and atmosphere. Human activity contributes increasing amounts of the so-called greenhouse gases, such as carbon dioxide, methane, and chlorofluorocarbon, to the atmosphere. Some of the particles and gases in the atmosphere also allow more sunlight to filter through to the earth's surface but reflect much of the radiant infrared energy that otherwise would escape through the atmosphere back into space. See also global warming.

greenhouse effect

Planetary warming as a result of the trapping of solar energy beneath atmospheric gases. The composition and concentration of the gases in the atmosphere influence the earth's surface temperature because some gases more effectively retain heat than others. Fossil fuel combustion, which has increased at a rapid rate since the 1950s, has deposited increasing amounts of carbon dioxide in the upper atmosphere. This is thought to be a contributory factor in global warming, a phenomenon suspected of having widespread effects on all ecosystems. See: global warming; ozone

greenhouse effect

The progressive earth-heating effect resulting from the transparency of the atmosphere to sun (solar) radiation at high frequencies and its relative opacity to energy re-radiated by the earth at a lower, less penetrative, frequency. Water vapour and carbon dioxide are the main elements concerned, and any increase in these, mainly from the burning of fossil fuels, enhances the heating effect. A rise in surface temperature could melt polar ice and cause widespread flooding.

greenhouse effect

  1. an effect occurring in greenhouses in which the glass transmits short wavelengths but absorbs and re-radiates longer wavelengths, thus heating the interior.
  2. the application of this effect to the earth's atmosphere. Infrared radiation tends to be trapped by carbon dioxide and water vapour in the earth's atmosphere and some of it is re-radiated back to the earth's surface.
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As such, the presence of the IPO would complicate the detection of greenhouse warming effects, as well as other external forcing, on ENSO changes.
But other, poorly measured, anthropogenic forcings, especially changes of atmospheric aerosols, clouds, and land-use patterns, cause a negative forcing that tends to offset greenhouse warming.
He adds most greenhouse warming simulators have shown storms will eventually die down, which would lead them to believe waves would simmer down, too.
Gelbspan goes on to say that there is no longer any controversy among mainstream scientists that artificial greenhouse warming is already happening and already poised to cause ghastly effects such as ice shelf collapse.
But we are not going to gasp for oxygen or feel greenhouse warming from this process, because most of the carbon from carbon dioxide taken in through the summer is still held in tree branches and stems.
With the new models, Kasting saw that all the early Mars calculations were too optimistic about greenhouse warming.
Consider greenhouse warming in design and operation of electricity-generating systems.
The Arctic region is in darkness during winter and the predominant type of radiation is long-wave or infrared, which is associated with greenhouse warming," Joey Comiso, senior scientist at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.
Natural variability [the impact of factors such as long-term temperature cycles in the oceans and the output of the sun] has been shown over the past two decades to have a magnitude that dominates the greenhouse warming effect," Georgia Tech climate science department chief Professor Judith Curry told the Daily Mail.
Even though the Arctic region has a relatively small greenhouse effect, the effect of the melted ice combined with greater transports of heat from the south are more than enough to make up for this modest 'local' greenhouse warming.
But most of the extra greenhouse warming goes into the ocean, which is why a third team recently studied the upper layers of the ocean.
In order to reduce the facility's greenhouse gas emissions (methane has 21 times the greenhouse warming potential as carbon dioxide) and to prevent the improper disposal of the animal wastes, the Punjab Energy Development Agency (PEDA) installed and commissioned this demonstration power generation facility based on the biomethanation process of cow manure.