green tea

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green tea

A beverage prepared from the leaves of an eastern Asian evergreen shrub, Camellia sinensis, which is believed to have a carcinoprotective effect greater than that of black tea (which is produced from green tea by a fermentation process). Both green and black tea have epigallocatechin gallate, an antioxidant responsible for the alleged protective effect.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

green tea

Popular health A beverage prepared from leaves of an eastern Asian evergreen shrub, Camellia sinensis. See Tea. Cf Caffeine, Coffee, Maté. ;.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

green tea

(grēn tē)
Chinese and Japanese tea purported to have health benefits, including reduction of risk of certain cancers and improvement in rheumatoid arthritis, elevated cholesterol, cardiovascular disease, infections, and immune function.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
However, if you're drinking green tea for taste, tap water will yield the best cup, ensuring it's not too bitter.
* A new source of green tea grown in Kenya and processed using a patentee technology has been shown to provide three times more polyphenols than most popular green teas.
Talking to reporter, Medical Expert from Poly Clinic Hospital, Dr Sharif Astori said excessive use of green tea which contained caffeine might have bad impact on people health.
The owner of the Alnwick-based Bari Tea Brewery, Caroline Stewart, says: "Green teas are generally unoxidised or have undergone just a small amount of oxidisation.
Representing about one third of the global tea production today, green teas range from hand-picked premium terroir and high quality leaf teas to industrial mainstream products like gunpowder, chunmee, and mass market senchas, for bulk and tea bags.
Although the liquid portions of the brewed teas did not contain measurable amounts of lead (i.e., no more than 1.25 meg per serving), when including the brewed leaves in the analysis, 2 to 5 meg of lead was detected per serving in four different products, including an "organic" green tea. Interestingly, measurable lead was not found in decaffeinated green teas or in a Japanese green tea.
Catechin and caffeine levels found in green tea can vary by more than 240% across products, according to new tests from White Plains, NY-based ConsumerLab.com.
Deciphering from the labels which bottled green teas supply the most green tea "goodness" is pretty much impossible.
Green tea is a type of tea made solely with the leaves of Camellia sinensis, that are steamed and undergo minimal oxidation during processing.
Green teas should brew for two minutes and 45 seconds, after which the tannin (a chemical compound that supplies astringency) starts to release its bitter flavor.
Some nutritionists have suggested that matcha, the green tea prepared during Japanese tea ceremonies, might offer more health benefits than the green tea most people drink in the United States.