Graves disease

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Graves dis·ease

(grāvz), [MIM*275000] Avoid the incorrect forms Grave and Grave's.
1. toxic goiter characterized by diffuse hyperplasia of the thyroid gland, a form of hyperthyroidism; exophthalmos is a common, but not invariable, concomitant finding;
2. thyroid dysfunction and all or any of its clinical associations;
3. an organ-specific autoimmune disease of the thyroid gland.

Graves dis·ease

(grāvz di-zēz')
1. Toxic goiter characterized by diffuse hyperplasia of the thyroid gland, a form of hyperthyroidism; exophthalmos is a common, but not invariable, concomitant finding.
2. Thyroid dysfunction and all or any of its clinical associations.
3. An organ-specific autoimmune disease of the thyroid gland.
See: thyrotoxicosis, Hashimoto disease, goiter, myxedema
Synonym(s): Parry disease.

Graves,

Robert James, Irish physician, 1796-1853.
Graves disease - thyroid dysfunction and all or any of its clinical associations. Synonym(s): Basedow disease; Marsh disease; ophthalmic hyperthyroidism; Parry disease
Graves ophthalmopathy - exophthalmos associated with thyroid disease. Synonym(s): endocrine ophthalmopathy; Graves orbitopathy
Graves orbitopathy - Synonym(s): Graves ophthalmopathy

Marsh,

Sir Henry, Irish physician, 1790-1860.
Marsh disease - Synonym(s): Graves disease

disease

pathogenic entity characterized by an identifiable aetiological agent, group of signs and symptoms and/or consistent anatomical alterations; see syndrome

Graves dis·ease

(grāvz di-zēz') [MIM*275000]
1. Toxic goiter characterized by diffuse hyperplasia of the thyroid gland, a form of hyperthyroidism.
2. Thyroid dysfunction and all or any of its clinical associations.
3. Organ-specific autoimmune disease of thyroid gland.
Synonym(s): Basedow disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
Skeletal remains outside of cists were situated between grave stones, usually slightly above the natural ground level and with no traces of specific burial structures--a situation commonly interpreted as burial in the hollows recessed into the grave's stone body.
He suggested the place of the initial decomposition to have been directly behind the grave's ring wall and the single bones found there to be the leftovers from removing the skeletons for reburial within the encircled area.
A similar layer of limestone shingles was present all over the grave surface, including the central cist, which led Vassar to suggest that the limestone coating had been purposefully superimposed in the final stages of the grave's usage to conceal the inner structures.
The western inhumation was lying at a depth of ca 30-35 cm from the grave's surface and may have had a south-east-north-west orientation, with head to the south-east.
The sherds are clearly different from the rest of the grave's pottery and date from later periods, the Middle or Late Iron Age.
The majority of the grave's approximately thousand potsherds, however, come from Ilmandustyle and Cord-Impressed potteries and date from the Pre-Roman Iron Age.