megalomania

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megalomania

 [meg″ah-lo-ma´ne-ah]
a mental state characterized by delusions of exaggerated personal importance, wealth, power, or goodness. adj., adj megaloma´niac.

meg·a·lo·ma·ni·a

(meg'ă-lō-mā'nē-ă),
1. A type of delusion in which the afflicted person considers himself or herself possessed of greatness. He/she believes him/herself to be Christ, God, Napoleon, anyone famous, or everyone and everything, including a lawyer, physician, clergyman, merchant, prince, or super athlete in all sports.
2. Morbid verbalized overevaluation of oneself or of some aspect of oneself.
[megalo- + G. mania, frenzy]

megalomania

/meg·a·lo·ma·nia/ (-ma´ne-ah) unreasonable conviction of one's own extreme greatness, goodness, or power.megaloma´niac

megalomania

(mĕg′ə-lō-mā′nē-ə, -mān′yə)
n.
1. A psychopathological condition characterized by delusional fantasies of wealth, power, or omnipotence.
2. An obsession with grandiose or extravagant things or actions.

meg′a·lo·ma′ni·ac′ n.
meg′a·lo·ma·ni′a·cal (-mə-nī′ə-kəl), meg′a·lo·man′ic (-măn′ĭk) adj.

megalomania

[meg′əlōmā′nē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, megas + mania, madness
an abnormal mental state characterized by delusions of grandeur in which one believes oneself to be a person of great importance, power, fame, or wealth. Also called grandiosity. See also mania.
A popular term for what the American Psychiatric Association terms ‘delusional disorder, grandiose subtype’ DSM-IV 297.1. Delusions of grandeur are characterised as ‘delusions of inflated worth, power, knowledge, identity, or special relationship to a deity or famous person’

meg·a·lo·ma·ni·a

(meg'ă-lō-mā'nē-ă)
1. A delusion of greatness; e.g., belief that one is Christ, God, Napoleon, a prince, or an ace athlete in all divisions of sport.
2. Morbid verbalized overevaluation of oneself or of some aspect of oneself.
[megalo- + G. mania, frenzy]

megalomania

A delusion of power, wealth, omnipotence or grandeur.
References in periodicals archive ?
For very successful people, your lack of need for sleep or grandiose delusions can be a temporarily helpful thing.
The persecutory themes may predispose individuals to suicidal behavior, and the combination of persecutory and grandiose delusions with anger may predispose individuals to violence.
On psychological examination, he had mild untidiness in the external appearance, dynamism, increase in speech, strikingness, labile mood, euphoric affection, increase in thought production, grandiose delusions, decrease in sleep (2 hours a day) and increase in libido and in his insight, he denied that he had any behavioral change.
For example, grandiose delusions that involve the antichrist can be associated with harm toward others.