megalomania

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megalomania

 [meg″ah-lo-ma´ne-ah]
a mental state characterized by delusions of exaggerated personal importance, wealth, power, or goodness. adj., adj megaloma´niac.

meg·a·lo·ma·ni·a

(meg'ă-lō-mā'nē-ă),
1. A type of delusion in which the afflicted person considers himself or herself possessed of greatness. He/she believes him/herself to be Christ, God, Napoleon, anyone famous, or everyone and everything, including a lawyer, physician, clergyman, merchant, prince, or super athlete in all sports.
2. Morbid verbalized overevaluation of oneself or of some aspect of oneself.
[megalo- + G. mania, frenzy]

megalomania

(mĕg′ə-lō-mā′nē-ə, -mān′yə)
n.
1. A psychopathological condition characterized by delusional fantasies of wealth, power, or omnipotence.
2. An obsession with grandiose or extravagant things or actions.

meg′a·lo·ma′ni·ac′ n.
meg′a·lo·ma·ni′a·cal (-mə-nī′ə-kəl), meg′a·lo·man′ic (-măn′ĭk) adj.
A popular term for what the American Psychiatric Association terms ‘delusional disorder, grandiose subtype’ DSM-IV 297.1. Delusions of grandeur are characterised as ‘delusions of inflated worth, power, knowledge, identity, or special relationship to a deity or famous person’

meg·a·lo·ma·ni·a

(meg'ă-lō-mā'nē-ă)
1. A delusion of greatness; e.g., belief that one is Christ, God, Napoleon, a prince, or an ace athlete in all divisions of sport.
2. Morbid verbalized overevaluation of oneself or of some aspect of oneself.
[megalo- + G. mania, frenzy]

megalomania

A delusion of power, wealth, omnipotence or grandeur.
References in periodicals archive ?
J's religious and grandiose delusions continue throughout hospitalization despite treatment with antipsychotics.
Grandiose delusions: a review and theoretical integration of cognitive and affective perspectives.
The persecutory themes may predispose individuals to suicidal behavior, and the combination of persecutory and grandiose delusions with anger may predispose individuals to violence.
The latest manifestation of this grandiose delusions was his last weekend's declaration in media interviews, of former Vice President Atiku Abubakar's presidential bid as unhealthy for the nation.
On psychological examination, he had mild untidiness in the external appearance, dynamism, increase in speech, strikingness, labile mood, euphoric affection, increase in thought production, grandiose delusions, decrease in sleep (2 hours a day) and increase in libido and in his insight, he denied that he had any behavioral change.
In a report, a psychiatrist described the defendant as being in a state of 'mania' and having 'grandiose delusions.' He also believed he was a doctor, electrician and plumber.
All subjects had paranoid delusions; 89% had referential delusions, 53% had grandiose delusions, 32% had somatic delusions, 95% had bizarre delusions, 95% had auditory hallucinations, 68% had visual hallucinations, 26% had tactile hallucinations, 26% had olfactory hallucinations, and 63% had Schneiderian forms of hallucination (such as hearing running commentary or two or more voices conversing with each other).