grab bar

(redirected from Grab bars)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

bar

 [bahr]
1. a structure having greater length than width, and often some degree of rigidity.
2. a heavy wire or a wrought or cast metal segment, longer than its width, used to connect parts of a removable partial denture.
3. a long narrow rigid structure that a patient can grasp to assist in stabilization.
grab bar a fixed bar in the bathroom to assist a patient in preventing falls while bathing or toileting.
median bar a fibrotic formation across the neck of the prostate, producing obstruction of the urethra.
parallel b's a set of bars running parallel to each other; the patient holds them with the hands to ambulate safely.
tarsal bar tarsal coalition.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

grab bar

A bar attached to the wall to assist in basic activities of daily living.
See also: bar
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
If you simply need a little support to lower and raise yourself but there isn't a nearby surface to attach a grab bar, you can get safety frames that wrap around the toilet to offer support.
Grab bars can cost anywhere from $50 to $300 (not including installation).
If you've mounted towel bars or other hardware around the house, you'll have no trouble installing grab bars. It shouldn't take more than a few hours.
As with grab bars, proper installation into solid-wood bracing is essential.
Standard WingIts anchors and grab bars range in price from $9.99 to $29.99 each.
Grab bars can be placed in various positions along walls (bars must be screwed into studs) to help in moving about anywhere in the bathroom; various textured surfaces are available to make grabbing more effective.
Install grab bars near the commode and in the shower and bathtub.
The open plan layout inside has no steps or sills, and one of the three spacious bedrooms has a bathroom with a roll-in shower, double sinks with wheelchair access, and a raised toilet with fold-down grab bars.
The larger ground-floor bathroom features a roll-in shower and grab bars. It has sufficient space to allow lateral transfer to the toilet, which also has grab bars.
Individuals with good upper-body strength can use the grab bars for transfer, but most elders, especially older women, do not have good upper-body strength and cannot effectively use the grab bars in the standard position.
* Reinforcement behind bathroom walls (for later installation of grab bars)