bone conduction

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conduction

 [kon-duk´shun]
conveyance of energy, as of heat, sound, or electricity.
aberrant ventricular conduction the temporary abnormal intraventricular conduction of supraventricular impulses; called also ventricular aberration.
aerial conduction (air conduction) conduction of sound waves to the organ of hearing in the inner ear through the air.
anterograde conduction
1. forward conduction of impulses through a nerve.
2. in the heart, conduction of impulses from atria to ventricles.
atrioventricular conduction (AV conduction) the conduction of atrial impulses through the atrioventricular node and the His-Purkinje system to the ventricles.
bone conduction conduction of sound waves to the inner ear through the bones of the skull.
concealed conduction conduction that is not seen on the surface electrocardiogram but may be detected by its effect on subsequent impulses; common examples are the incomplete penetration of the AV junction during atrial fibrillation, the Wenckebach type penetration during atrial flutter, and the retrograde incomplete penetration following ventricular ectopic beats.
decremental conduction a gradual decrease in the stimuli and response along a pathway of conduction; it occurs in nerve fibers with reduced membrane potentials.
retrograde conduction transmission of a cardiac impulse backward in the ventricular to atrial direction; particularly, conduction from the atrioventricular node into the atria.
saltatory conduction the rapid passage of an electric potential between the nodes of ranvier in myelinated nerve fibers, rather than along the full length of the membrane.

bone con·duc·tion

in relation to hearing, the transmission of sound to the inner ear through vibrations applied to the bones of the skull.
Synonym(s): osteophony

bone conduction

n.
The process by which sound waves are transmitted to the inner ear by the cranial bones without traveling through the air in the ear canal.

bone con·duc·tion

(bōn kŏn-dŭk'shŭn)
audiology The transmission of sound to the inner ear through vibrations applied to the bones of the skull.

bone conduction

The transmission of sound to the inner ear hearing mechanisms by way of bone rather than by the normal air, eardrum and middle ear route.

bone con·duc·tion

(bōn kŏn-dŭk'shŭn)
audiology the transmission of sound to the inner ear through vibrations applied to the bones of the skull.
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