Gonyaulax

Gonyaulax

/Gony·au·lax/ (gon″e-aw´laks) a genus of dinoflagellates found in fresh, salt, or brackish waters, having yellow to brown chromatophores; it includes G. catanel´la, a poisonous species, which helps to form the destructive red tide in the ocean; see also under poison.

Gonyaulax

(go″nē-ō′laks″) [Gr. gony, knee + Gr. aulax, furrow]
A genus of dinoflagellates that causes certain shellfish that eat them to become toxic. It is one of the causes of red tides.

Gonyaulax

poisonous dinoflagellate which render shellfish eating them poisonous to animals eating the shellfish.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dodge 1989 (formerly Gonyaulax polyedra; by many authors Lingulodinium polyedrum).
The organism was identified by Harry Beal Torrey as the Peridinium Gonyaulax.
Thomas WH, Gibson CH (1990) Quantified Small-Scale Turbulence Inhibits a Red-Tide Dinoflagellate Gonyaulax polyhedral Stein.
The genus Gonyaulax, with notes on its skeletal morphology and a discussion of its generic and specific characters.
Dinoflagellate (67); Gonyaulax (16); Ceratium (7); Prorocentrum (7); Amphidinium (1); Dinophysis (1); Protoperidinium (1)
The purification and characterization of the poison produced by Gonyaulax catenella in axenic culture.
Hardeland, "Photoperiodism and effects of indoleamines in a unicellular alga, Gonyaulax polyedra," Science, vol.
Gonyaulax birostris Gonyaulax pacifica Gonyaulax polygramma Gonyaulax spinifera Gymnodinium sp Gymnodinium fusus/ Gyrodinium falcatum Gyroninium spirale Heterocapsa triquetra Histioneis crateriformis Histoneis c/eaveri Histoneis joergensenii Karenia cf.
Los generos de Bacillariophyta con mayor numero de taxa (Apendice 2) fueron: Chaetoceros (48), Rhizosolenia (13), Thalassiosira (11), Nitzschia (10) y Coscinodiscus (8), y de Dinophyta: Neoceratium-Ceratium (69), Protoperidinium (62), Gymnodinium (18), Dinophysis (16), Gonyaulax (16), Phalacroma (15), Prorocentrum (13), Oxytoxum (10), Gyrodinium (10) y Karenia (8).
Comparison of toxicity between populations of Gonyaulax tamarensis of eastern North American waters.
Balech (1974) used differences in the number and shape of cingular plates to separate Protoperidinium from Peridinium, and other taxa first described as species of Peridinium have been moved to other genera including Gymnodinium, Gonyaulax, Ceratium, irhompsodinium and Glochidinium based on differences from the plate pattern of P.