gonophore

(redirected from Gonophores)
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fallopian tube

 [fah-lo´pe-an]
a slender tube extending laterally from the uterus toward the ovary, one on each side, allowing passage of ova to the cavity of the uterus and of spermatozoa in the opposite direction. Called also uterine tube and oviduct.

When the mature ovum leaves the ovary it enters the fringed opening of the fallopian tube, through which it travels slowly to the uterus. When conception takes place, the tube is usually the site of fertilization. Obstruction or infection within the fallopian tubes is a major cause of infertility. The removal of one tube by surgery, or the failure of a tube to function, ordinarily leaves the other tube intact and able to perform its function in reproduction. Occasionally the fertilized ovum implants in the wall of the fallopian tube, resulting in an ectopic, or tubal pregnancy.
Fallopian tube. From McKinney et al., 2000.

gon·o·phore

, gonophorus (gon'ŏ-fōr, gō-nof'ŏ-rŭs),
Any structure serving to store up or conduct the sexual cells; oviduct, spermatic duct, uterus, or seminal vesicle; an accessory generative organ.
[G. gonē, seed, + phoros, bearing]

gon·o·phore

, gonophorus (gon'ŏ-fōr, gō-nof'ŏr-ŭs)
Any structure serving to store up or conduct the sex cells; oviduct, spermatic duct, uterus, or seminal vesicle; an accessory generative organ.
[G. gonē, seed, + phoros, bearing]

gonophore

any structure bearing gonads but particularly the specialized polyp of colonial COELENTERATES which bears the gonads and is shaped like a sessile medusa -a form of GONOZOOID.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Material studied: Salvador City, Farol da Barra, on rock outcrop, 18 m depth, 1.iii.1993, four colonies, 4 mm high, without gonophores [N 1836]; Northern Coast, Arembepe Beach, on external beach rock bank, 6-8 m depth, 15.xi.1995, eighteen colonies, up to 4 mm high, gonophores observed [N 1837]; Arembepe region, on coral-algal buildup, 37 m depth, 18.vi.1992, eleven colonies, 3-4 mm high, without gonophores [N 1838]; Guarajuba Beach, on coastal emergent reef wall, 6-8 m depth, 23.iv.1997, five colonies, 4 mm high, without gonophores [N 1839]; Praia do Forte Beach, on coastal emergent reef wall, 5-6 m depth, 25.iv.1997, twenty colonies, 3-4 mm high, without gonophores [N 1840].
Material studied: Todos os Santos Bay, Fontes Island, on Eudendrium carneum, 1-2 m depth, 3.vi.1995, four colonies, 4-5 mm high, without gonophores [N 1827]; Northern Coast, Arembepe region, 50 m depth, 20.ix.1995, eight colonies, 6 mm high, gonophores observed [N 1828]; 25 m depth, 20.xii.1992, eighteen colonies, 5-6 mm high, gonophores observed IN 1829]; 42 m depth, 24.ix.1996, twenty colonies, 5-6 mm high, gonophores observed [N 1830]; Northern Coast, Itacimirim Beach, on shallow bank reef, 15 m depth, 20.iv.1996, fifteen colonies, 10-12 mm high, without gonophores [N 1831]; Praia do Forte Beach, on coastal emergent reef wall, 5-6 m depth, 25.iv.1997, twenty three colonies, up to 12 mm high, without gonophores [N 1832].
After the actinula larvae were released from the maternal gonophores, their behavior and morphogenesis were observed on either clean or microbial-filmed glass petri dishes under a stereoscopic microscope.
After the gonotheca was cut open with a thin needle, the star-shaped embryos and preactinulae were picked up with the needle from the dissociated gonophores. Each specimen was placed on a glass slide to which a drop of approximately 200 mM [Mg.sup.2+] ASW was added to prevent shrinkage of the aboral tentacles and discharge of the nematocysts.
The colonies were basically dioecious, although bisexual polyps were occasionally observed; the form of the gonophores was very variable under laboratory culture conditions.