glycosidic bond

(redirected from Glycosidic linkage)

glycosidic bond

or

glycosidic link

a bond between the anomeric carbon of a carbohydrate and another group or molecule.
References in periodicals archive ?
Amylopectin is a branched polymer that in addition to [alpha]-1,4 glycosidic linkage also contains [alpha]-1,6 glycosidic linkage (Nigam and Singh, 1995).
3) of anomeric proton (I'H 4.83, H-1') of a glucose moiety with C-3 (I'C 79.5) of steroidal skeleton confirmed the position of attachment of glycone part, whereas, the HMBC interactions of H-1'' (I'H 4.79) with C-2' (I'C 78.8) and H-1''' (I'H 4.39) with C-4' (I'C 79.6) helped to establish the glycosidic linkage in 2.
The C-2 on a Sia structure can form a glycosidic linkage with another sugar.
The type of glycosidic linkage ([alpha]2-3), ([alpha]2-6) or ([alpha]2-8) can be deduced from the chemical shifts of [H3.sub.eq] and [H3.sub.ax], as shown in Table 8 of ref.
Chitinase is specific in hydrolyzing the compounds that contain glycosidic linkage. Ikeda et al.
Hydrolysis was needed to break the glycosidic linkage in order to get the constituent of monosaccharide units.
Iwata, "Mechanoanions produced by mechanical fracture of bacterial cellulose: ionic nature of glycosidic linkage and electrostatic charging," The Journal of Physical Chemistry A, vol.
Recently, researchers at the U.K.'s University of Reading used a range of model fecal fermentation systems to determine how monosaccharide composition, glycosidic linkage and molecular weight would affect the selectivity of the fermentation.
A disaccharide is built when two monosaccharides are bonded together in a glycosidic linkage. Other oligosaccharides and polysaccharides are compounds created with repeated glycosidic linkages.
The latter effect refers to conformational preferences about the glycosidic linkage in pyranosides and has been shown by Lemieux to play a significant role in controlling the conformational preferences of oligosaccharides such as the blood group antigens; the preferences are of importance in molecular recognition events mediated by carbohydrate-protein interactions.
Amylases are widely distributed hydrolytic enzymes involved in the cleavage of [alpha] 1-4 glycosidic linkage in starch and other related carbohydrates (Han et al., 2013).
Acid hydrolysis of the glycosidic linkages involves the following steps: (i) protonation of oxygen at glycosidic linkage; (ii) addition of water to the reducing sugar end group; and (iii) decomposition of protonated glycosidic linkages [22, 41-43].