glycoside

(redirected from Glycosides)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

glycoside

 [gli´ko-sīd]
any compound containing a carbohydrate molecule (sugar), particularly any such natural product in plants, convertible, by hydrolytic cleavage, into a sugar and a nonsugar component (aglycone), and named specifically for the sugar contained, such as fructoside (fructose), glucoside (glucose), or pentoside (pentose).
cardiac glycoside any of a group of glycosides occurring in certain plants (Digitalis, etc.), having a characteristic action on the contractile force of the heart muscle.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

gly·co·side

(glī'kō-sīd),
Condensation product of a sugar with any other radical involving the loss of the OH of the hemiacetal or hemiketal of the sugar, leaving the anomeric carbon as the link; thus, condensation through the carbon with an alcohol, which loses its hydrogen on its hydroxyl group, yields an alcohol-glycoside (or a glycosido-alcohol); links with a purine or pyrimidine -NH- group yield glycosyl (or N-glycosyl) compounds.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

glycoside

(glī′kə-sīd′)
n.
Any of a group of organic compounds, occurring abundantly in plants, that yield a sugar and one or more nonsugar substances on hydrolysis.

gly′co·sid′ic (-sĭd′ĭk) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

glycoside

Biochemistry
A molecule formed from the condensation of either a furanose or a pyranose with another molecule as an acetal nitrogen glycoside or phosphate ester glycoside; cardiac glycosides include digitoxin, digoxin and ouabain.

Herbal medicine
Any of a number of medicinally active compounds produced by plants, which include hydrocyanic (prussic acid), which gives cough syrup its bitter almond flavour, digitoxin, a cardioactive agent, and salicin, the basis for salicylic acid.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

glycoside

Pharmacology A molecule formed from the condensation of either a furanose or a pyranose with another molecule as an acetal, nitrogen glycoside, or phosphate ester glycoside; cardiac glycosides include digitoxin, digoxin, ouabain
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

gly·co·side

(glī'kō-sīd)
Condensation product of a sugar with any other radical involving the loss of the H of the hemiacetal or hemiketal OH of the sugar, leaving the O of this OH as the link.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

glycoside

an acetal derivative of a sugar that, on hydrolysis by enzymes or acids, gives rise to a sugar. Glycosides containing glucose are called glucosides, those with galactose are called galactosides. They render unwanted substances chemically inert or form food reserves such as GLYCOGEN.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Glycoside

An herbal carbohydrate that exerts powerful effect on hormone-producing tissues. The glycoside breaks down into a sugar and a non-sugar component.
Mentioned in: Echinacea
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

gly·co·side

(glī'kō-sīd)
Condensation product of a sugar with any other radical involving the loss of the OH of the hemiacetal or hemiketal of the sugar.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Flavonol glycosides from the aerial parts of Aceriphyllum rossii and their antioxidant activities.
Cassava, an edible tuberous root often made into flour, contains cyanogenic glycosides, which can result in fatal cyanide poisoning if not properly detoxified by soaking, drying, and scraping before being consumed.
The phytochemical analysis of extracts demonstrated the prevalence of anthraquinones, terpenoids, tannins, saponins, reducing sugar, flavonoids, alkaloids and cardiac glycosides. Most extracts depicted good potential of flavonoids (NaOH test) as compared to other bioactive compounds.
The venture will combine both companies' technologies for producing steviol glycoside products made through fermentation and will market its products under one brand name, EverSweet.
discussed that saponins are a special class of glycosides which have a soapy characteristic and facilitate the absorption of foods and medicine.
Test Sample###Alkaloids###Tannins###Flavonoids###Saponins###Phenols###Cardiac glycosides
bipinnatifida was formed by one methoxy derivative of tricetin (4), four chrysoeriol glycosides (32, 33, 38 and 42), and five apigenin-3-O-glycosides (22, 24, 26, 28 and 46); whereas that found for V.
Response variables included encapsulation efficiency of phenolic compounds and steviol glycosides. Polymer solutions were obtained by dissolving sodium alginate in deionized water and magnetic stirring for 24 h.
According to Clifford and colleagues, 3,5-diCQA contains product ions (e.g., m/z 353 representing a caffeoylquinic acid moiety, m/z 179 representing a caffeic acid moiety, and m/z 191 representing a quinic acid moiety) characteristic of all diCQA isomers, as well as CQA glycosides [13, 14].
However, research revealed that Reb A is just one of the 40+ steviol glycosides in the stevia leaf.
oleander is an ornamental plant and can cause cardiovascular disorders due to the presence of cardiac glycosides in 45 different species of this plant, which are toxic to human and animals (MARTINEZ et al., 2007).