glycosidase

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glycosidase

 [gli-ko´sĭ-dās]
any of a large group of hydrolytic enzymes acting on glycosyl compounds.
References in periodicals archive ?
Figure S4: sequence alignment of conserved regions between Bt[alpha]GTase and related glycoside hydrolase family GH77 members.
'Gene-centric metagenomics of the fiber-adherent bovine rumen microbiome reveals forage specific glycoside hydrolases', Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2009; 106: 194-853.
Sequence similarity analysis indicated that CtCel6 belonged to the glycoside hydrolase family 6 compared with other published GH6 family enzymes (Fig.
Cellulose-binding domain (CBD) was originally defined as noncatalytic polysaccharide-recognizing module of glycoside hydrolases (GHs).
Until now there are two distinct glycoside hydrolase (GH) families of alpha- L-fucosidases that have been identified: alpha-L- fucosidases that catalyze the hydrolysis using a retaining mechanism belonging to GH family 29 (GH29) (Cantarel et al.
The amylases act on [alpha]-1-4 glycosidic bonds and are therefore also called glycoside hydrolases. The first amylase was isolated by Anselme Payen in 1833.
Two "chitinases" (glycoside hydrolases [GHs]) present on NELoc-1 are predicted to be involved in mucin degradation, as is the large carbohydrate-binding metalloprotease, shown to be involved in mucinase activity in other clostridia.
Wright's study focused on a subset of the fungus's collection of cutting tools, on enzymes known as glycoside hydrolases. It's their job to break down complex sugars into simple sugars, a key step in the fuel production process.
They've identified enzymes that act as glycoside hydrolases, meaning they can break off the branching sugars that make hemicellulose so tough to deal with.
japonicus degrades all of the major plant cell wall polysaccharides (including crystalline cellulose, mannan, and xylan) by the activities of approximately 130 possible glycoside hydrolases [9]; C.
Some studies have shown the importance and the role of histidine in glycoside hydrolases [35-39].
[2] Jean-Emmanuel Sarry., Ziya Gunata., 2004, "Plant microbial glycoside hydrolases: Volatile release from glycosidic aroma precursors," Food Chemistry 87, pp.