glycoprotein

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glycoprotein

 [gli″ko-pro´tēn]
any of a class of conjugated proteins consisting of a compound of protein with a carbohydrate group.
α1-acid glycoprotein an acute phase protein found in blood plasma, an indicator of tissue necrosis and inflammation. Called also orosomucoid.
P-glycoprotein a cell-surface protein occurring normally in the colon, small intestine, adrenal glands, kidney, and liver, and also expressed by tumor cells. It is a modulator of multidrug resistance, mediating the transport of antineoplastic agents out of tumor cells.
variable surface glycoprotein any of several glycoproteins that form the antigenic protein coating of Trypanosoma brucei. The organisms contain numerous genes encoding hundreds of such glycoproteins and, by expressing individual ones successively, evade the immune system of the host.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

gly·co·pro·tein

(glī'kō-prō'tēn),
1. One of a group of proteins containing covalently linked carbohydrates, among which the most important are the mucins, mucoid, and amyloid.
See also: mucoprotein.
2. Proteins containing small amounts of carbohydrate, in contrast to mucoids or mucoproteins, usually measured as hexosamine; such conjugated proteins are found in many places, notably γ-globulins, α1-globulins, α2-globulins, and transferrin, and are contained in mucus and mucins.
See also: mucoprotein.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

glycoprotein

(glī′kō-prō′tēn′, -tē-ĭn)
n.
Any of a group of conjugated proteins having a carbohydrate as the nonprotein component.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

gly·co·pro·tein

(glī'kō-prō'tēn)
1. One of a group of protein-carbohydrate compounds (conjugated proteins), among which the most important are the mucins, mucoid, and amyloid.
2. Sometimes restricted to proteins containing small amounts of carbohydrate, in contrast to mucoids or mucoproteins.
See also: mucoprotein
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

glycoprotein

Any member of a class of proteins linked to carbohydrate units. They are called conjugated proteins and are of comparatively small molecular weight. Some, such as follicle stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone and chorionic gonadotropin, lose their function if the sugar part is removed; others can continue to function even if deglycosylated. Some glycoproteins are cell adhesion molecules.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

glycoprotein

any PROTEIN that contains sugars as part of the molecule.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

glycoprotein

One of a group of conjugated proteins formed by a protein and a carbohydrate, the most important being the mucins (as found in the lens capsule, vitreous humour) and mucoids (as found in bones, cartilage, tendons).
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann

gly·co·pro·tein

(glī'kō-prō'tēn)
One of a group of proteins containing covalently linked carbohydrates, among which the most important are the mucins, mucoid, and amyloid.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
As a specialized custom service provider for therapeutic glycoprotein development, Creative Biolabs announces a portfolio of glycoprotein production and corresponding analysis services, including but not limited to Custom Glycoprotein Synthesis and Glycoprotein Detections services.
Monitorung of early pregnancy and early embryonic mortality by ultrasound and determination of pregnancy-associated glycoproteins and progesterone in cows.
Rh-associated glycoprotein (RhAG) BGAs complex with Rh proteins (RhD, RhCE) in the red cell membrane ankyrin complex, and associate with glycophorin A and B (GPA, GPB), Landsteiner-Wiener (LW; ICAM-4) glycoprotein, and ultimately Band 3.
Yoo, "Quantitative mass spectrometric analysis of glycoproteins combined with enrichment methods," Mass Spectrometry Reviews, vol.
We could show this for FAB mass spectrometry in the positive as well as negative mode for underivatized oligosaccharides and glycopeptides obtained from glycoproteins. (14) In the past years, main steps forward as to instrumentation and ionization methods are realized, enabling the study of intact glycoproteins.
Nurden, "Polymorphisms of human platelet membrane glycoproteins: Structure and clinical significance," Thrombosis and Haemostasis, vol.
Changes in platelet membrane glycoproteins and platelet-leukocyte interaction during hemodialysis.
We describe here an efficient nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) assay of a composite biomarker of systemic inflammation called GlycA, which is the name we assigned to the prominent resonance in NMR spectra of plasma originating from the N-acetyl methyl group protons of mobile glycan residues of glycoproteins (15).
Mapping of 10 epitopes on bovine herpesvirus type 1 glycoproteins gI and gIII.
A subunit vaccine containing recombinant HeVsG glycoprotein (14) was formulated in a proprietary adjuvant (Zoetis).
Glycoprotein E2 is the major target of the protective immune response triggered against BVDV infection and is widely used for subunit vaccines [18,19].
Scientists already knew that levels of certain glycoproteins - proteins with a sugar coating that combat disease-causing microbes - differ with age.