photophosphorylation

(redirected from Glucose synthesis)
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pho·to·phos·phor·y·la·tion

(fō'tō-fos'fōr-i-lā'shŭn),
Formation of ATP as a result of absorption of light.

photophosphorylation

(fō′tō-fŏs′fôr-ə-lā′shən, -fər-)
n.
Phosphorylation induced by radiant energy in photosynthesis.

photophosphorylation

the production of ATP from ADP, with light as the energy source. The process takes place during the ‘light reactions’ of PHOTOSYNTHESIS which also result in the production of reduced NADP. The details of ATP and NADPH formation are given under LIGHT REACTIONS.
References in periodicals archive ?
These are then transported to the liver, where glycerol acts as a gluconeogenic substrate and free fatty acids as an energy source for glucose synthesis by the liver.
The amount of propionate absorbed from the rumen of well fed animals is frequently sufficient to meet the animals requirements for glucose synthesis (Bergman, 1973), It increases slightly in pregnancy (Steel and Leng, 1973b), but there is no evidence for an appreciable redirection of propionate metabolism towards glucose synthesis when the supply of glucose precursors is limited (Weeks, 1979).
Such change gives sufficient stimulus to initiate glycogenolysis in insect tissues and accelerate the development of glycogen units in response to stress inflicted by pesticide exposure to adapt the insecticide induced stress that cause the release of glucagons, corticosteroids and catecholamines stimulating glucose synthesis from the breakdown of glycogen to reduce energy demand (Dezwann and Zandee, 1972; Shoba et al., 2011).
What makes chlorogenic acids in green coffee extract particularly unique is that they inhibit glucose-6-phosphatase, an enzyme that promotes glucose synthesis and release in the liver (gluconeogenesis).
* Cancer and its therapies can divert dietary protein to energy production (glucose synthesis) and away from its primary anabolic roles.
Confirmation of this began with a study concluding that the chlorogenic acids in coffee inhibit glucose-6-phosphatase, in turn interfering with glucose synthesis and release within the body.