glomus

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glomus

 [glo´mus] (pl. glom´era) (L.)
a small histologically recognizable body composed primarily of fine arterioles connecting directly with veins, and having a rich nerve supply.
aortic glomus (glomus aor´ticum) aortic body.
glomus caro´ticum (carotid glomus) carotid body.
glomus choroi´deum an enlargement of the choroid plexus of the lateral ventricle.
coccygeal glomus (glomus coccy´geum) a collection of arteriovenous anastomoses formed by the median sacral artery close to the tip of the coccyx.

glo·mus

, pl.

glom·er·a

(glō'mŭs, glom'ĕr-ă), Avoid the incorrect plural glomi for this word.
1. A small, globular body.
2. A highly organized arteriolovenular anastomosis forming a tiny nodular focus in the nailbed, in the pads of the fingers and toes, ears, hands, feet, and in many parts and organs of the body. The afferent arteriole enters the connective tissue capsule of the glomus, becomes devoid of an internal elastic membrane, and develops a relatively thick epithelioid muscular wall and small lumen; the anastomosis may be branched and convoluted, richly innervated with sympathetic and myelinated nerves, and connected with a short, thin-walled vein that drains into a periglomic vein and then into one of the veins of the skin. The glomus functions as a shunt- or bypass-regulating mechanism in blood flow, temperature, and conservation of heat in the part as well as in indirect control of the blood pressure and other functions of the circulatory system. Synonym(s): glandulae glomiformes (1) , glomiform glands, glomus body
Synonym(s): glome
[L. glomus, a ball]

glomus

/glo·mus/ (glo´mus) pl. glom´era   [L.]
1. a small histologically recognizable body composed of fine arterioles connecting directly with veins, and having a rich nerve supply.
2. a specialized arteriovenous shunt occurring predominantly in the skin of the hands and feet, regulating blood flow and temperature.

glo´mera aor´tica  aortic bodies.
glomus caro´ticum  carotid body.
choroid glomus , glomus choroi´deum an enlargement of the choroid plexus of the lateral ventricle.
coccygeal glomus , glomus coccy´geum a collection of arteriovenous anastomoses near the tip of the coccyx, formed by the middle sacral artery.
jugular glomus , glomus jugula´re tympanic body.

glomus

(glō′məs)
n. pl. glomera (glŏm′ər-ə)
A small body, such as the carotid body, consisting of an anastomosis between fine arterioles and veins and supporting structures.

glomus

[glō′məs] pl. glomera
Etymology: L, ball of thread
a small group of arterioles connecting directly to veins and having a rich nerve supply.

glo·mus

, pl. glomera (glō'mŭs, glom'ĕr-ă)
1. A small globular body.
2. A highly organized arteriolovenular anastomosis forming a tiny nodular focus in the nailbed, pads of the fingers and toes, ears, hands, and feet and many other organs of the body. The anastomosis is convoluted and richly innervated and drains into a periglomic vein and then into one of the veins of the skin. The glomus functions as a shunt or bypass regulating mechanism in the flow of blood, temperature, and conservation of heat in the part as well as in the indirect control of the blood pressure and other functions of the circulatory system.
[L. glomus, a ball]

glo·mus

, pl. glomera (glō'mŭs, glom'ĕr-ă) [TA]
A small, globular body.

glomus

pl. glomera [L.] a small histologically recognizable body composed primarily of fine arterioles connecting directly with veins, and having a rich nerve supply.

glomus caroticum
carotid body.
glomus cell
a specialized cell of the carotid body.
glomus choroideum
an enlargement of the choroid plexus of the lateral ventricle.
glomus tumor
neoplasm of one of the chemoreceptors. Tumors of the glomus jugulare have been reported in a dog.
References in periodicals archive ?
In Nancy's terms, the globe is becoming a glome, and we are caught in the transition.
In fact, Orual seems to resent sharing Psyche, whether with her father, her tutor, or the people of Glome.
Glome was a web--I the swollen spider, squat at its center, gorged with men's stolen lives" (276).
6) In fact, the apparent absence of God from her virtuous activity on behalf of Glome is the most profound explanation for the novel's ambivalent attitude toward Orual's public justice.
The Fox, having opted to stay in Glome for her sake, dies largely neglected by her.
Why, Glome and the King and old Batta seem to me very like dreams now" (112).
The proximity (in more ways than one) of Glome to Greece, in combination with the resemblance of these scenes in Faces and Pearl, causes this pairing to resemble an instance of linguistic bricolage, a movement from "gladder gome [.
see also several passages in the novel in which Orual expresses a desire to overcome a similar false dichotomy, even if she cannot yet grasp Psyche's solution: "But I could not find out whether the doctrines of Glome or the wisdom of Greece were right.
After consulting her two advisors, Bardia (the captain of the guard from Glome, who has befriended her, instructed her in fighting, and helped her find her way to the mountain), and the Fox, her Greek tutor, she concludes that the situation cannot go on.
Meanwhile, Glome soon faces another crisis: the king is dying, as a result of injuries brought about by his own carelessness (184; Ch.
For her father, the Silver Mines had mainly been an instrument of slow death for criminals and slaves with whom he was angry, but she transforms it into a prospering concern which could make miners rich; then she uses some of the resultant wealth to have a beautiful statue of Aphrodite made in Hellenized lands and brought to Glome, where it is placed before the ancient "shapeless" stone of Ungit.
To her people, the Queen in combat is an oddity; the entire kingdom of Glome turns out to watch her first dual, against Argan of Phars.