Glasgow Outcome Scale


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Related to Glasgow Outcome Scale: Glasgow Coma Scale, Modified Rankin Scale

Glasgow Outcome Scale

A scale that assesses current neurological awareness of the environment, and recovery and disability in all types of brain injury. The scale is to be used during the evaluation of trauma, stupor, or coma, and at prescribed time intervals, such as 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year after injury. The Glasgow group reports the greatest recovery in the 6-month period after injury. The nurse (or other health care practitioner) notes the patient's abilities at a particular time using this practical scale: Good outcome: may have minimal disabling sequelae but returns to independent functioning comparable to preinjury level and a full-time job; Moderate disability: is capable of independent functioning but not of returning to full-time employment; Moderate disability: is capable of independent functioning but not of returning to full-time employment; Severe disability: depends on others for some aspect of daily living; Persistive vegetative state: has no obvious cortical functioning; Dead.
See also: scale
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
In this study, we compared GCS and FOUR score with outcome parameters like duration of ventilator days, duration of stay in ICU and length of hospital stay using Glasgow Outcome Scale. For this the patients of head injury were divided into two groups.
Most of the subjects (59.3%) had severe deficit at presentation (baseline NIHSS scoregreater than 16) and hence a poor outcome on 7th day of admission as found out by Glasgow outcome scale. Adams HP Jr et al16 compared the baseline NIHSS score and the TOAST score subtype as predictors of outcome at 7 days and 3 months after ischemic stroke.
For statistical analysis, outcome under the Glasgow outcome scale was divided into favourable (Good recovery and moderate disability) and unfavourable (Severe disability, persistent vegetative state and death).
Following treatment, just 15% of the 157 who received dexamethasone had unfavorable Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) scores of 1-4 (from death to moderate disability), compared with 25% of the 144 who received placebo.
Patients were graded according to modified Glasgow Coma Scale and finally outcome was graded by Glasgow outcome scale.
In the Norwegian multicenter study functional outcome was evaluated by GOSE, whereas Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) was used in the CRASH study.
Follow-up assessment periods may be too brief, because it increasingly appears that Glasgow Outcome Scale scores improve greatly over time, but at a very slow pace, he said.
In addition, studies in which surrogate measures of outcome were used (measures other than Glasgow Outcome Scale [GOS] or extended GOS) were excluded.
It is reported that the more severe the injury to the brain according to the Glasgow outcome scale (GOS) grade, the higher the risk for the development of posttraumatic epilepsy.
As measured by the Glasgow Outcome Scale at a mean follow-up of 20 months, outcomes were almost identical when aspirin users (3.83) were compared with nonusers (3.85).

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