erosion

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erosion

 [e-ro´zhun]
an eating or gnawing away; a shallow or superficial ulceration; in dentistry, the wasting away or loss of substance of a tooth by a chemical process that does not involve known bacterial action. adj., adj ero´sive.
cervical erosion destruction of the squamous epithelium of the vaginal portion of the cervix, due to irritation and later ulceration.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

e·ro·sion

(ē-rō'zhŭn),
1. A wearing away or a state of being worn away, as by friction or pressure. Compare: corrosion.
2. A shallow ulcer; in the stomach and intestine, an ulcer limited to the mucosa, with no penetration of the muscularis mucosa.
3. Chemically induced tooth loss, occurring mainly through acid dissolution. When the cause is unknown, it is referred to as idiopathic erosion. Synonym(s): odontolysis
[L. erosio, fr. erodo, to gnaw away]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

erosion

(ĭ-rō′zhən)
n.
The superficial destruction of a surface by friction, pressure, ulceration, or trauma.

erosive (ĭ-rō′sĭv) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

erosion

A wearing away, ulceration. See Apple core erosion, Cervical erosion.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

e·ro·sion

(ē-rō'zhŭn)
1. A wearing away or a state of being worn away, as by friction or pressure.
2. A shallow ulcer; in the stomach and intestine, an ulcer limited to the mucosa, with no penetration of the muscularis mucosae.
3. The wearing away of a tooth by nonbacterial chemical action; when the cause is unknown, it is referred to as idiopathic erosion.
Synonym(s): odontolysis.
[L. erosio, fr. erodo, to gnaw away]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

erosion

the wearing away of geological formations such as rock, soil, etc. For example, deafforestation or the removal of hedges causes soil erosion.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

e·ro·sion

(ē-rō'zhŭn)
1. Chemically induced tooth loss, occurring mainly through acid dissolution. When the cause is unknown, it is referred to as idiopathic erosion.
Synonym(s): odontolysis.
2. A wearing away or a state of being worn away, as by friction or pressure.
Compare: corrosion
[L. erosio, fr. erodo, to gnaw away]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Preserved saprolites and associated weathering fronts in, e.g., eastern Canada and southern Scandinavia are, in general, inferred to have been protected from glacial erosion due to lee-side positions (e.g., Bouchard and Godard 1984; Lidmar-Bergstrom et al.
Such mechanisms could be conservation due to sub-glacial accumulation of till, ineffective glacial erosion during warm-based conditions or close-to-ice-divide position (cf.
In August he attended the AAAS meeting in Cleveland, Ohio and delivered papers on the inadequacy of glacial erosion, which were disputed by N.H.
Spencer, J.W., 1888, Glacial erosion in Norway and in high latitudes: Transactions of the Royal Society of Canada, v.
The lie of the land, the elevation and form of summit and valley, is due to the geological origins of these granite mountains, formed more than 40 million years before the last ice age and shaped since by the slow process of glacial erosion. The Lairig Ghru, a famous high mountain pass that extends 43 kilometres from Aviemore in the west to Braemar in the east, is a classic U-shaped glacial valley.
He was, however, greatly disappointed because 'the products of glacial erosion are almost entirely dumped on the floor of the surrounding ocean and thus not available for investigation' (Mawson, 1949, p.
Given the slight monoclinal southward-dipping (11'-15') bedding of the Palaeozoic sedimentary rocks (Rouk & Raukas 1989), we infer that during pre-Weichselian glaciations Devonian rocks outcropped in the northern part of the drumlin field as well; glacial erosion has shifted the outcrop area of Devonian sandstones noticeably southward.
The high contents of garnet, pyroxene, and tourmaline, as well as quartz and feldspars (Q+Fp), indicate either intense glacial erosion on the shield or abrasion of earlier deposited unconsolidated sediments in the drumlin field.
On the contrary, the subglacial channels formed by glacial erosion are accompanied by end moraines at the outlets and along the edges, and glaciotectonic disturbances in the neighbourhood.
Evidence indicates that in areas of multiple ice-flow events: (1) indicators of glacial erosion (striations and streamlined landforms) can be biased towards earlier, highly erosive events (palimpsests) and that (2) till clast dispersal patterns can be more useful than striae or till geochemical dispersal patterns for identifying buried exploration targets (Broster and Huntley 1995).
Different reasons have been set forth for the formation of these palaeoincisions: (1) preglacial or interglacial river erosion, (2) glacial erosion of the Pleistocene glaciers, (3) glacial and glaciofluvial erosion during repeated advances and retreats of the Pleistocene glaciers.