erosion

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erosion

 [e-ro´zhun]
an eating or gnawing away; a shallow or superficial ulceration; in dentistry, the wasting away or loss of substance of a tooth by a chemical process that does not involve known bacterial action. adj., adj ero´sive.
cervical erosion destruction of the squamous epithelium of the vaginal portion of the cervix, due to irritation and later ulceration.

e·ro·sion

(ē-rō'zhŭn),
1. A wearing away or a state of being worn away, as by friction or pressure. Compare: corrosion.
2. A shallow ulcer; in the stomach and intestine, an ulcer limited to the mucosa, with no penetration of the muscularis mucosa.
3. Chemically induced tooth loss, occurring mainly through acid dissolution. When the cause is unknown, it is referred to as idiopathic erosion. Synonym(s): odontolysis
[L. erosio, fr. erodo, to gnaw away]

erosion

/ero·sion/ (ĕ-ro´zhun) an eating or gnawing away; a shallow or superficial ulceration; in dentistry, the wasting away or loss of substance of a tooth by a chemical process that does not involve known bacterial action.ero´sive

erosion

(ĭ-rō′zhən)
n.
The superficial destruction of a surface by friction, pressure, ulceration, or trauma.

erosive (ĭ-rō′sĭv) adj.

erosion

[irō′zhən]
Etymology: L, erodere, to consume
1 the wearing away or gradual destruction of a surface. For example, a mucosal or epidermal surface may erode as a result of inflammation, injury, or other causes, usually marked by the appearance of an ulcer. See also necrosis.
2 the action of acid (low pH) substances dissolving tooth structure. Can be due to habitual sucking on citrus fruits such as lemons, from acidic swimming pool water, or gastroesophageal reflux.

erosion

A wearing away, ulceration. See Apple core erosion, Cervical erosion.

e·ro·sion

(ē-rō'zhŭn)
1. A wearing away or a state of being worn away, as by friction or pressure.
2. A shallow ulcer; in the stomach and intestine, an ulcer limited to the mucosa, with no penetration of the muscularis mucosae.
3. The wearing away of a tooth by nonbacterial chemical action; when the cause is unknown, it is referred to as idiopathic erosion.
Synonym(s): odontolysis.
[L. erosio, fr. erodo, to gnaw away]

erosion

the wearing away of geological formations such as rock, soil, etc. For example, deafforestation or the removal of hedges causes soil erosion.

e·ro·sion

(ē-rō'zhŭn)
1. Chemically induced tooth loss, occurring mainly through acid dissolution. When the cause is unknown, it is referred to as idiopathic erosion.
Synonym(s): odontolysis.
2. A wearing away or a state of being worn away, as by friction or pressure.
Compare: corrosion
[L. erosio, fr. erodo, to gnaw away]

erosion

an eating or gnawing away; a shallow or superficial ulceration; in dentistry, the wasting away or loss of substance of a tooth by a chemical process that does not involve known bacterial action.
References in periodicals archive ?
eastern Canada and southern Scandinavia are, in general, inferred to have been protected from glacial erosion due to lee-side positions (e.
Such mechanisms could be conservation due to sub-glacial accumulation of till, ineffective glacial erosion during warm-based conditions or close-to-ice-divide position (cf.
Wider knowledge of the spatial distribution of preserved weathering forms, indicating restricted glacial erosion, also assists in deciphering the glacial history and improves the understanding of the Laurentide Ice Sheet dynamics.
1888, Glacial erosion in Norway and in high latitudes: Transactions of the Royal Society of Canada, v.
On the contrary, the subglacial channels formed by glacial erosion are accompanied by end moraines at the outlets and along the edges, and glaciotectonic disturbances in the neighbourhood.
He was, however, greatly disappointed because 'the products of glacial erosion are almost entirely dumped on the floor of the surrounding ocean and thus not available for investigation' (Mawson, 1949, p.
Given the slight monoclinal southward-dipping (11'-15') bedding of the Palaeozoic sedimentary rocks (Rouk & Raukas 1989), we infer that during pre-Weichselian glaciations Devonian rocks outcropped in the northern part of the drumlin field as well; glacial erosion has shifted the outcrop area of Devonian sandstones noticeably southward.
The high contents of garnet, pyroxene, and tourmaline, as well as quartz and feldspars (Q+Fp), indicate either intense glacial erosion on the shield or abrasion of earlier deposited unconsolidated sediments in the drumlin field.
This glacial flow direction represents initial glacial erosion from the advance of local Appalachian ice (Pronk et al.
Evidence indicates that in areas of multiple ice-flow events: (1) indicators of glacial erosion (striations and streamlined landforms) can be biased towards earlier, highly erosive events (palimpsests) and that (2) till clast dispersal patterns can be more useful than striae or till geochemical dispersal patterns for identifying buried exploration targets (Broster and Huntley 1995).