monad

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monad

 [mo´nad]
1. a single-celled protozoon or coccus.
2. a univalent radical or element.
3. in meiosis, one member of a tetrad.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

mon·ad

(mon-'ad),
1. A univalent element or radical.
2. A unicellular organism.
3. In meiosis, the single chromosome derived from a tetrad after the first and second maturation divisions.
[G. monas, the number one, unity]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

monad

(mō′năd′)
n.
1. Philosophy An indivisible, impenetrable unit of substance viewed as the basic constituent element of physical reality in the metaphysics of Leibniz.
2. Biology A single-celled microorganism, especially a flagellate protozoan formerly classified in the taxonomic group Monadina.

mo·nad′ic (mə-năd′ĭk), mo·nad′i·cal adj.
mo·nad′i·cal·ly adv.
mo′nad·ism n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

mon·ad

(mō'nad)
1. A univalent element or radical.
2. A unicellular organism.
3. In meiosis, the single chromosome derived from a tetrad after the first and second maturation divisions.
[G. monas, the number one, unity]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

monad

  1. any single-celled organism.
  2. a single cell resulting from meiosis (instead of a tetrad).
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Catana, L.: The concept of contraction in Giordano Bruno's philosophy.
This research has managed to rise the deepest and most important core of the true foundation of Giordano Bruno's speculative thinking--the active presence of a triadic theological-political concept of the Father, the Son and the Spirit of Christian tradition.
A similar, albeit less successful, attempt was made by the Inquisition to destroy the writings of Giordano Bruno. The Church ordered that all available copies of his books were to be burned in St Peter's Square.
Gingerich finds that copies were once on the shelves of such people as John Maynard Keynes and Saint Aloysius Gonzaga, as well as King George II of England and the philosopher Giordano Bruno. Gingerich's long mission has yielded a book that supports Copernicus' forty place in history and offers an unusual look at the development of astronomy.
Istoriar la figura: Syncretism of Theories as a Model of Philosophy in Frances Yates and Giordano Bruno, PAUL RICHARD BLUM
(15.) Giordano Bruno and the Hermetic Tradition (New York, 1969), 111.
Giordano Bruno called himself "The awakener of sleeping souls," and went through life like a sword of the sun; but his reward was to be burned in the physical flame that is the parallel of the spiritual flame.
Giordano Bruno, radical philosopher, sometime monk, poet and playwright, Renaissance memory-man and admirer of Elizabeth I, went to the stake for his ideas 400 years ago.