ginsenoside

(redirected from Ginsenosides)

ginsenoside

(jin-en-ō-sīd),
The presumed active component in ginseng, from the chemical class of saponins.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
In our previous study, the C24 epimeric ocotillol-type saponins were gained from 20(S)-Protopanaxadiol (20(S)-PPD), 20(S)-Protopanaxatriol (20(S)-PPT), 20(S)-Ginsenoside Rh1 (20(S)-Rh1), 20(S)-Ginsenoside Rg2 (20(S)-Rg2), 20(S)-Ginsenoside Rh2 (20(S)-Rh2) and 20(S)-Ginsenoside Rg3 (20(S)-Rg3), their cardioprotective effects were evaluated, and results showed that 24(R)-ocotillol type saponins exhibited significantly stronger myocardial protective effects than their corresponding 24(S)-epimers and ginsenosides, demonstrating distinct stereoselective activity [7-11].
The study concluded that BG provides increased anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive effects due to the change in ginsenosides profile that occurs in processing.
Direct and comprehensive analysis of ginsenosides and diterpene alkaloids in Shenfu injection by combinatory liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric techniques.
"Ginseng roots contain substances known as 'ginsenosides', some of which are stimulating and some of which are relaxing," says Dr Brewer.
Both North American and Asian ginseng roots, but also the leaves and the berries, are rich in ginsenosides, which are the molecules that generate the medicinal properties and benefits, and which are exclusive to the panax plants.
The bioactive compounds of ginseng include polyacetylenes, phenolics, polysaccharides and various ginsenosides (14).
Design: PubMed, CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health), Ovid MEDLINE, and EMBASE databases were searched using Medical Subject Heading and keyword terms, including ginseng, Panax, ginsenosides, ginsenoside* (wild card), fatigue, fatigue syndrome, cancer-related fatigue, and chronic fatigue.
While many investigations have focused on the role of ginsenosides in aerobic interventions (Kim et al., 2005; Liang et al., 2005; Pumpa et al., 2013; Morris et al., 1996; Bandyopadhyay et al., 2011; Dorling et al., 1980; Ziemba et al., 1999) there is a lack of research investigating the effect of ginseng on anaerobic performance and recovery.
The effect of the pure compounds occurring in some plant able to modulate BDNF, such as salidroside, caffeine, epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate, and ginsenosides Rg1 and Rb1, will be reviewed as well whereas the effect of the pure compounds curcumin and resveratrol, which have been extensively studied as effective modulators of BDNF, will not be considered in the present review.
Siberian ginseng is composed of a number of compounds called eleutherosides but shows no trace of the ginsenosides found in Panax ginseng.