Ginkgo extract

Ginkgo extract

Made from the leaves of the Ginkgo biloba tree, this extract, used in other countries to treat circulatory problems, may improve the symptoms of patients with dementia.
Mentioned in: Dementia
References in periodicals archive ?
She suggests trying a ginkgo extract, which she believes can improve blood flow to the inner ear, and possibly help tackle vertigo and tinnitus where symptoms are linked with abnormal circulation.
Reports on ginkgo extract adulteration date back to 2003, when researchers observed uncharacteristically high amounts of the flavonoid rutin in a sample of bulk material.
Active compounds in Ginkgo extract possess antioxidant [1-3], antiasthmatic [4], and wound-healing properties [5], improve blood circulation, discourage clot formation, reinforce the walls of capillaries, and protect nerve cells from harm when deprived of oxygen [6].
In a study with 80 patients with vascular cognitive impairment (not diagnosed with dementia), a combined therapy of ginkgo extract with conventional treatment of aspirin over three months significantly improved executive function, attention, abstract-thinking, delayed memory, and orientation when compared with the control group (aspirin treatment only) [25].
As early as 1970, studies showed that ginkgo extract exerts therapeutic effects on cardiovascular diseases.
2010; van Beek and Montoro 2009) In fact, extensive clinical research has found that standardized ginkgo extract may reduce patients' risk of developing a number of mental diseases, including Alzheimer's.
The authors undertook research to investigate the influence of a specific type of ginkgo extract, EGb761[R] on embryofoetal development in mice during the critical period of organogenesis (6th to 15th day of pregnancy) by oral administration to the dams.
Direct and indirect cholinergic activity has been reported with administration of ginkgo extract in vitro (Das 2002, Nathan 2000).
Researchers found that four years later, 29 out of 966 people who were given the placebo developed Alzheimer's disease, compared with 15 out of 947 of the subjects who took the ginkgo extract EGb 761.
They were randomized either to twice-daily doses of placebo or 120 mg of ginkgo extract. Although the extract was safe, it was not associated with any significant cognitive improvement (JAMA 2008;300: 2253-62).
And, regarding that higher dose, we see the need for a purer Ginkgo extract containing terpene lactones at a much higher concentration.
They were randomized to twice-daily doses of either placebo or 120 mg of ginkgo extract. Although the extract was safe, it was not associated with any significant cognitive improvement (JAMA 2008;300:2253-62).