Ryle

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Ryle

(rīl),
John A., English physician, 1889-1950. See: Ryle tube.
References in periodicals archive ?
5) See, for example, Michael Polanyi, Personal Knowledge (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1958); Gilbert Ryle, The Concept of Mind (Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1949); and Michael Oakeshott, Rationalism in Politics (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 1991).
El argumento mas familiar contra la alternativa A1 es el que Gilbert Ryle esgrime contra lo que el llama la 'leyenda intelectualista' (1945/6; 1949, 30-31).
Gilbert Ryle (1949) presented an even more direct attack on what he referred to as Descartes' "ghost in the machine" (p.
El filosofo britanico Gilbert Ryle hacia una analogia entre el trabajo de los ingenieros civiles y el de los filosofos.
Nor is such a conversion ever likely since, as philosopher Gilbert Ryle pointed out, it would invoke the category mistake: intermingling separate and distinct orders of discourse.
The present book is based on the 1996 Professor Gilbert Ryle lecturers established by the philosophy department of Trenrt University in 1977.
Undaunted by these realities and conflicts, Pinker begins by reviewing the development of the concept of the Blank Slate: the initial idea advanced by John Locke that all knowledge comes from experience; the Noble Savage, Rousseau's notion that humans were originally "self-less, peaceable, and untroubled"; and the Ghost in the Machine, a term advanced by Gilbert Ryle to capture the Cartesian account of dualism.
His philosophical views can be traced most clearly to the influence of his Oxford teacher, philosopher Gilbert Ryle.
Thus, the essential error of some readers "fooled" by AnimalFarm has been what Gilbert Ryle termed a "category mistake": they mistake its genre.
The depsychologization of desire is traced more generally to an obsession with finding criteria of emotions (at the cost of a more developmental account), rationalism and intellectualism, a strong tendency to treat mental dispositions as a purely epistemic matter, but also to the lingering influences of one Gilbert Ryle.
The section on Gilbert Ryle does not cite his most important book, The Ghost in the Machine.
It is much more the expression of a middle-class personality so confident of its own values, so fortified by the reading of Gilbert Ryle, A.