Gila monster

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Gi·la mon·ster

(hē'lă mon'stĕr),
A large poisonous lizard, Heloderma suspectum of New Mexico, Arizona, and northern Mexico.
[Gila, a river in Arizona]

Gila monster

(hē′lə)
n.
A large stocky venomous lizard (Heloderma suspectum) of the southwest United States and western Mexico, having black and orange, pink, or yellowish beadlike scales.
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However, previously published reports described an aggressive interaction between Morafka's desert tortoise and a Gila monster (Heloderma suspectum), where a female tortoise was observed attacking a Gila monster that tried to raid her nest and eat her eggs (Vaughan, 1984; Barrett and Humphrey, 1986; Zylstra et al., 2005).
Ecology and behavior of the Gila monster in southwestern Utah.
dissertation (Haxel 1977), the junior author observed a Gila Monster at close range on the south side of Black Mountain in the southern Chocolate Mountains of southeasternmost California (Fig.
Assuming that the sighting was unremarkable at the time, Haxel made a casual annotation in the margin of his copy of Jaeger 0957) The North American Deserts, next to the description of the Gila Monster. By the time of the sighting Haxel had been mapping in the southern Chocolate Mountains for more than two years, and was quite familiar with the only other large lizard species in the area, the Common Chuckwalla (Sauromalus ater).
Consider, for example, what fossils say about the ages of the sandhill crane (10 million years old), the Gila monster (30 million years old) or the tailed frog (150 million years old).
The Southwest's Gila monster, at least 30 million years old, is also aided by chemical defense-as Cecil Schwalbe, a biologist at the U.S.
-- Two additional female Gila monsters at the Zoo were also found to be passing oocysts of this new species.
It is worth noting that the record on the California side of the Colorado River is not the westernmost record of Gila monsters from this area (Funk, 1966).
Jude McNally, assistant director at the Arizona Poison Control Center, confirms that Gila monsters can indeed be painfully poisonous.
Simply gorgeous drawings by John Francis from cover to inside encourage leisure browsing and reading despite a title which sounds quite ordinary: once inside, kids in grades 4-6 will find How Animals Live is packed from cover to cover with inviting natural history facts about a wide range of animals, from jewel fish and wild schools of animals to gila monsters. It's the lovely illustrations which are eye-catching on every page, making for a survey hard to put down.
Killer, Evil or Giant Slugs, Worms, Snowmen, Klowns, Catfish, Frogs, Trolls, Ticks, Christmas Trees, Grasshoppers, Blobs, Elves, Elevators, Gila Monsters, Leprechauns, Shews, Bats and Rats - plus Attacking Vegetables and Fungi of any kind (including, but not limited to avocados, tomatoes and mushrooms)
KEEPING GILA AT BAY: Nate Deason, venomous serpent curator at the Phoenix Herpetological Society, holds a Gila monster. The creatures, protected in Arizona, can fetch up to $1,500 a piece on the black market, experts say.