G

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G

 
gram (or grams); gingival; glucose; gonidial.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

G

Abbreviation or symbol for gravitational units , under unit; gap3; gauss; giga-; d-glucose, as in UDPG; guanosine, as in GDP; glycine; guanine.

G


g

Abbreviation for gram; gaseous state.

g

Unit of acceleration based on the acceleration produced by the earth's gravitational attraction, where 1 g = 980.621 cm/sec2 (about 32.1725 ft/sec2) at sea level and 45° latitude. At 30° latitude, g equals 979.329 cm/sec2.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

G

abbr.
1. gauss
2. genitive
3. goal
4. goalkeeper
5. gravitational constant
6. guanine
7. Football guard
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

G

Symbol for:
1. Conductance.
2. Ganglion.
3. Gastrin.
4. Giga-, SI for 109
.
5. Globulin.
6. Glucose.
7. Glycine.
8. Glycogen.
9. Gravida.
10. Guanidine.
11. Guanine.
12. Guanosine.
13. Gynecology.

g

Symbol for:
1. Gas.
2. Genome, see there.
3. Gram, see there.
4. Gravity, see there.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

G

Abbreviation for newtonian constant of gravitation; d-glucose;
gap;
gauss;
giga-;
glycine;
guanine;
guanosine.

g

Abbreviation for gram.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

G

abbrev.
  1. the nitrogenous base GUANINE found in NUCLEIC ACIDS.
  2. GLYCINE.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

G

Abbreviation for guanosine.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
According to Table 2, the standard Gibbs free energy changes for most of the reactions at the hydrogen and acetic acid production phases are greater than zero, indicating that most of the reactions do not take place spontaneously from left to right under standard conditions.
Furthermore, since the standard state for this reaction is hydrogen ions with an activity of 1.0 (pH = 0) on the surface of platinum metal in equilibrium with hydrogen gas at a pressure of [10.sub.5] Pa (0.987 atm), this relationship also directly relates tabulated data on chemical thermodynamics and the Gibbs free energy change for a reaction ([DELTA]G) to a potential and the activity of hydrogen molecules on the surface of an electrode where that reaction is occurring.
Living organisms permanently mobilize their Gibbs free energy in order to create new possibilities that have direct biological significance.
For certain special conditions, the availability for a control mass system reduces to the Helmholtz or the Gibbs free energy. In either case, the system and the surroundings must be at the same temperature.
Commonly known as "rust," [Fe.sub.2][O.sub.3] (hematite) is very unstable and as its Gibbs Free Energy of Formation illustrates, it will dissociate into FeO when exposed to ferrous melt temperatures.
This leads us to the Gibbs free energy G, (not to be confused with shear modulus G) which defines the maximum work a process can perform under a constant pressure thus;
Summary: In this paper, the effect of magnetized water on the stability constant Kst, oscillation strength f, molar extinction coefficient Iumax and Gibbs free energy IG for complexes wa s investigated.