genocide

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Related to Genocides: Armenian Genocide

genocide

[jen′əsīd]
the systematic extermination of a national, ethnic, political, religious, or other population.
The systematic killing of a select group of individuals in a population that is sanctioned by a country’s leaders, thereby constituting a policy, which may have the local medical community’s implied support.

genocide

(jĕn′ō-sīd″) [Gr. genos, race, + L. caedere, to kill]
The willful and planned murder of a particular social or ethnic group.
References in periodicals archive ?
After over a hundred years, the children in Michigan will learn about all forms of Genocide, especially the Armenian Genocide and Jewish Holocaust.
On Saturday night House President Yiannakis Omirou said all civilised states should recognise the Armenian genocide to avert similar crimes against humanity.
Khambouly Dy contends that teaching the past through genocide education "is the only effective way to prevent future genocide and other grave human rights violations" (2009).
Balkan Genocides is well-organized and filled with sound analysis.
Genocide is thus conceived as qualitatively different from other forms of state-enacted violence.
The ICTY decided that, after a two-year trial, the prosecution had not presented enough evidence for any judge to find Karadzic guilty of genocide early in the Bosnian War (he faces a separate count for the July 1995 massacre at Srebrenica, and the prosecution is appealing the acquittal).
Interestingly, and coincidentally, last night I heard about a documentary, Scream Bloody Murder, which examines the policies and actions of the United States government in relation to genocide--from the Iraqi gassing of the Kurds in northern Iraq through genocide that is being perpetrated today.
Preventing Genocide is dense with information and copiously sourced.
May states that genocide is the most serious of all international crimes (the crime of genocide should be seen as an international crime).
In 2007, the International Court of Justice held that states could commit genocide.
John Docker's The Origins of Violence: Religion, History and Genocide contributes to understandings of what drives genocide and acts of inter-group violence.
The tribunals usually never hav xe the death penalty, the defendants will never be able to rerehabilitated and there are mountains of stalling, threats to witnesses and generally make genocide trials more of a political statement that those who kill and torture hundreds of thousands of people at a time can even be brought to justice.