genocide

(redirected from Genocides)
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Related to Genocides: Armenian Genocide
The systematic killing of a select group of individuals in a population that is sanctioned by a country’s leaders, thereby constituting a policy, which may have the local medical community’s implied support.

genocide

(jĕn′ō-sīd″) [Gr. genos, race, + L. caedere, to kill]
The willful and planned murder of a particular social or ethnic group.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Documentation Centre of Cambodia (DC-Cam) has published a book on historic incidents of genocide and mass murder and expressed its desire to see it included in the Cambodian school curriculum.
Marking April 24 1915, considered the start of the massacre of the Armenians, Mr Erdogan said nations who accuse Turkey of genocide have a "bloody past".
The Turkish president stressed that one must not attribute committing of any genocide to Muslims and Turks.
The seminar was dedicated to the 27th Anniversary of Khojaly Genocide occurred on February 26, 1992.
How do we understand and explain when and why genocide occurs?
The collection Colonial Genocide in Indigenous North America emerged from a conference where the participants found strong lines of agreement--and where many fundamental disagreements were clearly put forward and discussed.
Gangi's Genocide in Contemporary Children's and Young Adult Literature: Cambodia to Darfur contributes to this debate by arguing that young people can--and possibly should--learn about genocide through fiction and non-fiction but that these stories need to be told in a way that does not misrepresent specific genocidal events either through incorrect facts or inappropriate language.
The next part of the book examines the immediate post-WWI period and the multiple genocides that occurred during this era.
In turn, the finality and illegitimacy of the state's imposition of death upon communities of its own civilian citizens is then understood as a definitional aspect of genocide, the 'crime of crimes.' Genocide is thus conceived as qualitatively different from other forms of state-enacted violence.
Rarely does one read such hopeful news: In late June, the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia acquitted former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic of genocide. That might sound like a bad thing: Karadzic, who once warned Bosnia's Muslims that war would lead them down the road to hell, surely deserved to be sentenced for the acts of which he was just acquitted -- murder, siege and slaughter almost beyond naming.
We fully expect this request to be accepted by the Assembly, so that Welsh Armenians can gain comfort that Wales does not participate in the lie perpetuated by British governments for political reasons since 1985 that there was no genocide.
A critical idea that Franklin Littell proposed well before most seriously considered it--certainly long before governments, the United Nations, and most scholars--was his Genocide Early Warning System.