Gengou

Gen·gou

(zhawn-gū'),
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Bordet and Gengou were successfully isolated this Gram Negative bacteria which is now called Bordetella Pertussis (Hewlett et al., 1998).
The organism was first isolated in 1906 by Jules Jean Baptiste Vincent Bordet and Octave Gengou. The first documented epidemic of pertussis occurred in Europe in 1578.
Da reagao de Bordet e Gengou na molestia de Carlos Chagas como elemnento diagnostico.
pertussis isolates were grown on Bordet Gengou agar (Becton Dickinson, Sparks, MD, USA) supplemented with 10% defibrinated horse blood (Oxoid, Basingstoke, UK) at 37[degrees]C for 3-5 days before subculture and incubation at 37[degrees]C for 24 h.
Bordetella pertussis was cultured in Bordet Gengou agar for 3 days at 37[degrees]C.
In 1906, Drs Bordet and Octave Gengou succeeded in isolating and cultivating the bacterium, later called Bordetella pertussis (from Latin per, intensive, and tussis, cough), which causes whooping cough, a deadly disease in young children.