Geneva Protocol


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A document prepared by the League of Nations during the 1925 Geneva Conference, which was intended to ban the use of chemical and biological weapons. The protocol didn’t prevent production, storage or transfer of such weapons, a loophole that was closed in the 1972 Biological Weapons Convention and the 1993 Chemical Weapons Convention.

Geneva Protocol

Global village A document prepared by the League of Nations during the 1925 Geneva Conference intended to ban chemical weapons. See Chemical Weapons, Ypres. Cf Geneva Convention.
References in periodicals archive ?
But that is because the majority did not understand that states designed the CWC to remedy the various deficiencies of the 1925 Geneva Protocol. In making this claim, I am not suggesting that states specifically intended to punish people who use toxic chemicals to poison goldfish.
(155) Thus, the evidence supports the conclusion that the noninternational armed conflict and the law it invokes--Common Article 3 of the Geneva Conventions, custom, domestic law, and Additional Geneva Protocol II--extend to terrorist groups located in Yemen, including AQAP.
146; see also Geneva Protocol I, supra note 9, art.
The "minimum" (66) IHL requirements for detention are set forth in Article 75 of Geneva Protocol I, a treaty ratified by the overwhelming majority of States.
Meselson wrote a U.S.-centric policy paper recommending that the United States ratify the Geneva Protocol of 1925.
Italy suffered no consequences for its use of chemical weapons against Abyssinia in 1935 because the League of Nations was unable to agree on a response to the violation of the Geneva Protocol. The international community was indifferent to Egypt's flagrant violation of the Geneva Protocol in the mid-to-late 1960s in part because of the Cold War and in part because the United States did not want to risk a backlash against its own use of tear gas and herbicides, notably Agent Orange, in Vietnam.
Restricting the use of asphyxiating gases as a method of warfare, the 1925 Geneva Protocol was an early measure of success in attempts to abolish chemical weapons.
So in 1925, most of the world's countries signed the Geneva Protocol, banning the use of chemical weapons.
(36) States reaffirmed the Hague Declaration's prohibition on the use of chemical weapons and expanded the prohibition to include bacteriological methods of warfare in the Geneva Protocol for the Prohibition of the Use in War of Asphyxiating, Poisonous or Other Gases, and of Bacteriological Methods of Warfare of 1925 (Geneva Protocol).
Article 51 of the 1977 Geneva Protocol I specifically prohibits attacks 'which may be expected to cause incidental loss of civilian life, injury to civilians, damage to civilian objects, or a combination thereof'.
The language of the Geneva Protocol of March 1925 required League of Nations signatories to be automatically bound to apply military, economic and naval sanctions against an aggressor state at the behest of the Council.