Geneva Convention


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Geneva Convention

 
an international agreement of 1864, whereby, among other pledges, the signatory nations pledged themselves to treat the wounded and the army medical and nursing staff as neutrals on the field of battle.

Ge·ne·va Con·ven·tion

(jĕ-nē'vă cŏn-ven'shŭn),
An international agreement formed at meetings in Geneva, Switzerland, in 1864 and 1906, relating (among medical subjects) to the safeguarding of the wounded in battle, of those having the care of them, and of the buildings in which they are being treated. The direct outcome of the first of these meetings was the establishment of the Red Cross Society.

Geneva Convention

n.
One of a series of agreements first formulated at an international convention held in Geneva, Switzerland, in 1864, establishing rules for the treatment of prisoners of war, the sick, and the wounded.
An international standard first established in 1864 regarding the conduct of the military towards medical personnel, and the obligations of medical personnel during acts of war. The Geneva Conventions consist of four treaties and three additional protocols that set the standards in international law for humanitarian treatment of the victims of war. The singular term Geneva Convention refers to the agreements of 1949

Geneva Convention

Declaration of Geneva Global village A standard established in 1864 regarding the conduct of the military towards medical personnel, and obligations of medical personnel during acts of war. See Helsinki Declaration, Nuremburg Code of Ethics, Unethical medical research. Cf Geneva Protocol.
References in periodicals archive ?
The monument depicts soldiers and armed carriers/bearers stretching their hands to receive the Geneva Conventions, which signifies respect, implementation and promotion of the Geneva Conventions and additional protocols that call for humane treatment for victims and those caring for them.
the drafters of the 1929 Geneva Convention and 1949 Geneva Conventions
(8) With roughly one-third of all military research worldwide being devoted to technology, the era of using super soldiers will require us to occasionally rewrite the rules of war within the Geneva Conventions. (9) Currently, the United States Pentagon spends 400 million dollars a year researching and exploring ways to create super soldiers through human enhancement technology that would allow soldiers to be combat operational even after 48 hours of sleep deprivation.
This is how the United States absolves itself of any allegation violating the Geneva Convention of torture, degrading treatment of prisoners and war crimes.
Despite the San Remo Manual, which is not a binding law but a codification of customary law, all major parties in the Yemen conflict, including Saudi Arabia, Yemen itself, and Egypt, have ratified the Geneva Convention, along with Protocols I and II, which is therefore binding law.
In some cases, as in the ratification of the 1949 Geneva Convention, the
The Saudi ambassador called upon the states signed in the Fourth Geneva Convention to ensure application of the Convention and international law in the occupied Palestinian territories, including East Al-Quds, and to take the necessary measures compelling Israel to respect the international law.
(9) Geneva Convention Relative to the Treatment of Prisoners of War, August 12, 1949, in Documents on the Laws of War, 246 (Art.
5] displays either an innocent ignorance concerning both the workings of the United Nations and the context and purpose of the Geneva Convention, or an inexcusable attempt to support his position through insidious innuendo.
(33) This change is also reflected in the first Geneva Convention of 1864 where treatment of detainees first took on a legal obligation.
In a global landscape marked by complex, asymmetrical conflicts as well as the increasingly common use of autonomous weapons the 1949 Geneva Conventions are more crucial than ever, prominent legal and humanitarian figures told the Security Council today, as members considered the relevance of international humanitarian law in a rapidly changing world.
UNITED NATIONS -- Diplomats and humanitarian experts on Tuesday praised the 1949 Geneva Conventions that for 70 years have banned attacks on civilians, schools and hospitals while acknowledging an uptick in egregious violations of the laws of war in high-tech modern warfare.

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