Geneva Convention


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Geneva Convention

 
an international agreement of 1864, whereby, among other pledges, the signatory nations pledged themselves to treat the wounded and the army medical and nursing staff as neutrals on the field of battle.

Ge·ne·va Con·ven·tion

(jĕ-nē'vă cŏn-ven'shŭn),
An international agreement formed at meetings in Geneva, Switzerland, in 1864 and 1906, relating (among medical subjects) to the safeguarding of the wounded in battle, of those having the care of them, and of the buildings in which they are being treated. The direct outcome of the first of these meetings was the establishment of the Red Cross Society.

Geneva Convention

n.
One of a series of agreements first formulated at an international convention held in Geneva, Switzerland, in 1864, establishing rules for the treatment of prisoners of war, the sick, and the wounded.
An international standard first established in 1864 regarding the conduct of the military towards medical personnel, and the obligations of medical personnel during acts of war. The Geneva Conventions consist of four treaties and three additional protocols that set the standards in international law for humanitarian treatment of the victims of war. The singular term Geneva Convention refers to the agreements of 1949

Geneva Convention

Declaration of Geneva Global village A standard established in 1864 regarding the conduct of the military towards medical personnel, and obligations of medical personnel during acts of war. See Helsinki Declaration, Nuremburg Code of Ethics, Unethical medical research. Cf Geneva Protocol.
References in periodicals archive ?
If current thinking prevails, however, our choice is limited to this profoundly troubling Geneva Convention option on one hand or, on the other, abandonment of the law of war altogether to resolve these issues in a peacetime context.
The notion that the Geneva Conventions do not apply to Taliban prisoners never made any sense.
Lib-Dem defence spokesman Paul Keetch said: "The president was at pains to say he was at war and all prisoners taken should be treated as PoWs under the Geneva Convention.
While saying that most of the protections set down by the Geneva Conventions would be provided the detainees in Cuba, Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld has insisted the captives held at the base in Cuba are not legal combatants and as such are not prisoners of war, a legal status that would provide them with greater rights under the Geneva Conventions, which the United States and most other nations are party to.
In the event of territorial occupation, persons suspected or accused of committing acts hostile to the occupying power, persons tried for such acts and penal law prisoners by the provisions of the Fourth Geneva Convention (for instance, Palestinians detained or interned by Israel).
Most provisions of the Geneva Conventions and Hague rules have express application only during armed conflict between states--not, for example, during civil war within a state.
UN Security Council Resolution 446 refers to the Fourth Geneva Convention as the applicable international legal instrument, and calls upon Israel to desist from transferring its own population into the territories or changing their demographic makeup.
It stated: "PHROC therefore emphasizes that in order to bring to an end Israel's repeated disregard of the provisions of the Fourth Geneva Convention, the High Contracting Parties must discuss, agree upon, and undertake concrete action to ensure that Israel's pattern in conducting hostilities across the OPT, particularly in the Gaza Strip, is not tolerated.
Ambassador Riyad Mansour told the Security Council that the international community was obliged to ensure protection of Palestinian civilians under the Geneva Conventions on the conduct of war and occupation.
Common Article 3 of the Geneva Convention prohibits each party to the conflict from taking of hostages, killing, mutilation, torture and other degrading treatment, among others, of 'persons taking no active part in the hostilities, including members of armed forces'.
government, however, determined that al-Qaeda terrorists and members of the Taliban captured during the course of this conflict did not meet the requirements of prisoners of war and, as such, were not entitled to the protections of the Third Geneva Convention Relative to the Treatment of Prisoners of War (GCIII).
Settlements are illegal under international law as they violate Article 49 of the Fourth Geneva Convention, which prohibits the transfer of the occupying powers civilian population into occupied territory.

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