introgression

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Related to Genetic introgression: introgressive hybridization

introgression

(ĭn′trə-grĕsh′ən)
n.
The movement or spread of alleles of one species into the gene pool of another through repeated backcrossing of interspecific hybrids with members of one of the parental species.

in′tro·gres′sive (-grĕs′ĭv) adj.
References in periodicals archive ?
Each individual specimen must be sequenced for this region and potential problems arise when examining specimens of hybrid origin or taxa with extensive historical genetic introgression.
Moreover, fishes present problems with contemporary hybridization and historical genetic introgression common in many groups (Hopkins and Eisenhour, 2008).
Therefore, before conservation in 1987, the Taoyuan pig ancestor genome likely experienced genetic introgression from the Berkshire breed.
Reproductive compatibility is critical for successful genetic introgression between populations.
Whereas genetic introgression of domesticated stocks with wild stocks cannot be completely eliminated, some control can be gained by limiting the collection and culture of domesticated stocks to geographic units defined by the genetic structure of wild stocks.
Ecological competition has been hypothesized to be the primary cause of species displacement and genetic introgression to be a secondary cause (Gill 1980, Confer 1992).
Rapid, geographically extensive genetic introgression after secondary contact between two pupfish species (Cyprinodon, Cyprinodontidae).
Frequency comparisons of species-specific cytoplasmic (mtDNA) and nuclear (allozymes) markers can give considerable insight into the dynamics of genetic introgression (Lansman et al.
All samples from areas previously exhibiting genetic introgression had high frequencies of introduced (C.
Such results also support the idea that these populations are indeed of hybrid origin with genetic introgression of the very distinct detoxification abilities of the two species for Salicaceae and Magnoliaceae (Scriber et al.