genomic imprinting

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genomic imprinting

epigenetic process that leads to inactivation of paternal or maternal allele of certain genes susceptible to epigenetic regulation; accounts, among others, for the Angelman and Prader-Willi syndromes.

genomic imprinting

differential expression of a gene or genes as a function of whether they were inherited from the male or the female parent (e.g., a deletion on chromosome 15 that causes Prader-Willi syndrome if inherited from the father causes instead Angelman's syndrome if inherited from the mother).

ge·nom·ic im·print·ing

(jē-nō'mik im'print-ing)
Epigenetic process that leads to inactivation of paternal or maternal allele of certain genes susceptible to epigenetic regulation; accounts, among others, for the Angelman and Prader-Willi syndromes.

genomic imprinting

The concept, derived from an increasing body of compelling evidence, that the expression of some of the genes depends on whether they have been derived from the father or from the mother. It has been shown, for instance, that chromosomal deletion in chromosomes of parental origin may differ in their effect from the same deletion in the homologous chromosome of maternal origin. Many cancers are associated with loss of a particular chromosome derived from a particular parent—usually the mother. The DNA of some genes is modified during the formation of gametes so as to have altered expression and be activated or inactivated.

genomic imprinting

the process whereby certain genes are modified (principally by METHYLATION) during GAMETOGENESIS, resulting in differential expression of parental alleles depending on whether of maternal or paternal origin. The ‘imprinted’ regions of the DNA are generally less active in transcription. Offspring normally inherit one maternal and one paternal copy of their genes, and generally both copies are active. However, expression of certain genes occurs from only one of the two copies, as a result of imprinting of either the maternal or paternal ALLELE at a particular LOCUS. The phenomenon can occur in a variety of organisms. Only a few human genes are imprinted and they tend to be clustered in the genome. Imprinting may have no effect on health and development, but in some cases can cause medical disorders such as Prader-Willi Syndrome and Angelman Syndrome. See also UNIPARENTAL DISOMY.
References in periodicals archive ?
It concluded with the speculation that, depending on the stage of development of the embryo, "the newly implanted fetal material may impart a genetic imprint on its new host, making the result at best a hybrid of both DNA ancentries.
Looking back over the century-plus of modernism we find both a development and a sense of recurrence, as would be appropriate to a genetic imprint.
This methodology uses a patient's genetic imprint and other critical histological dynamics central to a disease's incidence, such as lifestyle and environmental factors.
The first is that it's punctuated by dramatic and discrete climate-driven dispersal events, and the second is that the opportunistic mating between the two species as their ranges overlapped has left a strong genetic imprint, according to the research summary on Current Biology's website.
Although the underlying cause is unknown, our theory is that altered birth conditions could cause a genetic imprint in the immune cells that could play a role later in life.
The journey continues to Tamil Nadu, where the latest DNA research takes him to a village in which everyone still bears the genetic imprint of those "first Indians" who went on to populate the rest of the world.
Depending on the stage of development of the embryo, the newly implanted fetal material may impart a dominant genetic imprint on its new host, making the result at best a hybrid of both DNA ancestries.
They have also rifled the files of everything from Bauhaus to Kraftwerk and their fingerprints are all over The Bunnymen and The Smiths but on the strength of this gig, they've a genetic imprint of their own.
Solter suggested that the interplay between nuclear reprogramming and genetic imprints could be explained by a simple analogy from school where the teacher writes a long string of formulas on the black board.
Scientists at the Natural History Museum in London and the Institute of Genetics at Nottingham University want to save their genetic imprints in a "Frozen Ark" DNA bank at minus 80 deg C.

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