clinic

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clinic

 [klin´ik]
1. an establishment where patients are admitted for special study and treatment by a group of health care professionals practicing together.
2. a clinical lecture; examination of patients before a class of students; instruction at the bedside.
satellite clinic a facility owned by a hospital but operated at a distant site.
walk-in clinic a facility that offers health care services without an appointment.

clin·ic

(klin'ik),
1. An institution, building, or part of a building where ambulatory patients receive health care.
2. An institution, building, or part of a building in which medical instruction is given to students by means of demonstrations in the presence of the sick.
3. A lecture or symposium on a subject relating to disease.
[G. klinē, bed]

clinic

(klĭn′ĭk)
n.
1. A facility, often associated with a hospital or medical school, that is devoted to the diagnosis and care of outpatients.
2. A medical establishment run by several specialists working in cooperation and sharing the same facilities.
3.
a. A seminar or meeting of physicians and medical students in which medical instruction is conducted in the presence of the patient, as at the bedside.
b. A place where such instruction occurs.
c. A class or lecture of medical instruction conducted in this manner.

clinic

Graduate education
A lecture in which a patient is present; instruction of students at the bedside; rarely used in the US.

Medspeak
A place where patients are seen on an outpatient basis, either as a first-time visit, or as a follow-up to some form of previous evaluation or therapy.
 
Medspeak-UK
A schedule of appointments normally held on a regular basis at a particular place—usually on hospital premises, including outpatient department or inpatient ward, or offsite in a health centre. Patients are booked to attend clinics, usually with a consultant or his/her team, for consultation, evaluation, treatment, education or counseling.

Psychiatry
A place where patients are treated for a specific kind of disorder, either medical or mental (often understood to be the latter), particularly with reference to substance abuse.

clinic

Medical practice A site where Pts are seen on an outpatient basis, either as a first-time visit, or as a follow-up to some form of previous evaluation or therapy. See Ambulatory care, Betty Ford Clinic, Free clinic, Pain clinic, University health clinic Psychiatry A place where Pts are treated for a specific kind of disorder; either medical or mental.

clin·ic

(klin'ik)
1. An institution, building, or part of a building where ambulatory patients receive health care.
2. An institution, building, or part of a building in which medical instruction is given to students by means of demonstrations in the presence of the sick.
3. A lecture or symposium on a subject relating to disease.
[G. klinē, bed]

clinic

1. A medical institution in which a number of specialists work in association, usually dealing with outpatients.
2. A training session in practical medicine for medical students.

clin·ic

(klin'ik)
1. An institution, building, or part of a building where ambulatory patients receive health care.
2. An institution, building, or part of a building in which medical instruction is given to students by means of demonstrations in the presence of the sick.
3. A lecture or symposium on a subject relating to disease.
[G.klinē, bed]

Patient discussion about clinic

Q. Is there any clinical evidence to support to my question? Can acupuncture help reduce the pain in fibromyalgia? Is there any clinical evidence to support to my question?

A. Yes, acupuncture therapy can reduce the fatigue, widespread pain and sleep problems associated with fibromyalgia. If acupuncture can be used in place of pain reliever then its good as the side effect associated with pain relievers are reduced.

Q. I want to know what causes clinical depression? My friend is diagnosed with clinical depression. He is showing signs for the past six months. We found this when he lost interest in music which was his soul before. He lost interest in all other activities including hang out with us. We were wondering what could be the reason for the drastic change in his behavior. Very recently he stopped attending school also. We have tried to contact him but in vain. Then we got to know from his brother that he feels very low and depressed and is diagnosed with clinical depression? I want to know what causes clinical depression?

A. Any neurotransmitters imbalance in the brain can cause the mood to go down. This makes the person depressed. This can happen due to genetic impact. The social or financial difficulty can cause the disturbances in neurotransmitters, which causes depression in a person. Try to know from him whether he has any history of failures which he is hiding within him. Try to know the exact cause of depression. Depression, if left unattended, could develop in to Bipolar Disorder.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BloACoqVs1o&eurl=http://www.imedix.com/health_community/vBloACoqVs1o_cathy_tells_ppd_postpartum_depression_story?q=post%20partum%20depr&feature=player_embedded

Q. What's the difference between clinical depression that needs treating, and just regularly being depressed? I'm often depressed, and i just wondered what the difference is between just being depressed, and clinical? At what point does depression become depression?

A. It depends on the duration of the episodes, the frequency and severity. Even psychiatrists have trouble to pinpoint it. They often disagree on the “borderly” cases, here is some info on the diagnose of depression:
http://www.intelihealth.com/IH/ihtIH/WSIHW000/8596/35222/362840.html?d=dmtContent

More discussions about clinic
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, the HA will continue to promote primary care services and ensure that family medicine specialist clinics and general out-patient clinics play a gatekeeper's role, thereby alleviating the pressure on SOPC waiting time.The HA does not keep statistics on the average appointment quota per hour per consultation room, the average time lapse from a patient's appointment registration time to the patient's receiving diagnoses and treatment, and the average time lapse from blood taking to the completion of the blood test report by the laboratory for each of the SOPCs.
Some members of the public have relayed that the services provided by general out-patient clinics (GOPCs) are unsatisfactory.
To dovetail with the Government Vaccination Programme, public hospitals and general out-patient clinics will cease providing seasonal influenza vaccination from September 1 and will resume the service when the Government Vaccination Programme 2017/18 starts.

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